Health & Safety

October 5, 2012

Desert Wind 13-01 tests incident response capabilities, modernized medical training

Tags:
Laura Mowry
Staff writer

First responders demonstrate their emergency response capabilities during the Desert Wind 13-01 exercise, which tested Edwards’ response to a major aircraft incident Oct. 1. Medical personnel trained for the first time using a METIman mannequin, adding a new dimension of realism to the exercise, better preparing them for real-world scenerios.

Team Edwards kicked off the new fiscal year Oct. 1 with exercise Desert Wind 13-01, testing the base’s response capabilities to a major aircraft incident. Personnel were assessed by the Exercise Evaluation Team throughout three strategic objective phases in response to an F-16 Fighting Falcon that crashed during a routine training mission.

Personnel worked throughout the day and were evaluated on the initial notification process, which includes notifying the proper agencies, and ensuring that the information passed to first responders is correct and arrives in a timely manner. Medical response to the injured pilot was also assessed, along with the death notification process of an active duty service member.

“The exercise was a success. We learned some things that we need to tighten up and introduced props for the first time to increase the realism. I’m very pleased with the results,” said Frank Sporer, 412th Plans and Programs installation EET chief.

First responders prepare to transport the METIman mannequin during exercise Desert Wind 13-01 after demonstrating their emergency response capability to the Exercise Evaluation Team Oct. 1.

While the Edwards community is no stranger to participating in exercises such as Desert Wind 13-01, for the first time medical personnel had a valuable resource to enhance the training experience. Rather than simulating medical procedures on volunteers, the 412th Medical Group had the opportunity to practice the real thing on a new, highly advanced piece of equipment.

“The METIman mannequin is a highly technical, highly advanced mannequin that assists in training. It added to the training scenario by allowing us to go beyond our normal capabilities using volunteers as patients,” said Ryan Billings, 412th MDG Emergency Medical Technician program manager. “We can’t start an IV on patients, we can’t see significant injuries, and we can’t cut their legs open to facilitate bleeding. This allows us to do that.”

The mannequin is operated through a simulator, which is controlled wirelessly from a nearby laptop. It gives the operator complete control over the patient’s environment. The technology provides virtually a limitless variety of scenarios for medical personnel to train with.

“The only way you can get that kind of experience is through actual real-world events. And we don’t want those happening,” said Billings.

The 412th MDG ordered the mannequin direct from the company METIman and decided on the model that focuses on the pre-hospital setting – an ideal choice for practicing emergency response capabilities to a major aircraft incident, as well as other exercise scenarios the Edwards community faces, such as disaster response.

“The mannequin really suits our needs; it’s designed for the pre-hospitable setting. It focuses a lot of its enhancements and computer programs for that environment.

The types of injuries we would see normally. We could take it, put it in a car and simulate injuries resulting from a car accident. For this exercise, we used him as an aircraft pilot who ejected during a crash,” said Billings.

“The paramedics had to go out there and actually treat and practice to the best of their abilities on this mannequin. He had a closed head injury; an open femur fracture; he had a punctured chest and having this resource allowed our medics to practice those advanced life support skills,” he continued.

In addition to allowing personnel from the 412th MDG to realistically practice lifesaving medical procedures, the $50,000 mannequin breathes, talks, bleeds and can be easily configured to meet the various training needs.

“What happened in the past is volunteers would show up and we would have these staged, real life patients with makeup on them. We would attach a card to them that said what their symptoms were. But most of the time the responders saw that and the realism factor went out the window,” said Randall Wells, 412th MDG EET chief.

“They wouldn’t break out the equipment half the time because they knew this wasn’t real.”

Bringing in the METIman mannequin for Desert Wind 13-01 forced responders to not only ask questions, but gave them valuable experience as they had to treat the patient in real time, while being evaluated by the EET.

More realistic training for medical personnel keeps the Edwards community safer and improves the base’s readiness for real-world scenarios.

“From the perspective of the Exercise Evaluation Team, the sky is the limit. There are all kinds of things we’re going to do with this guy,” said Wells.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Eagle Eyes promotes community’s involvement in security

Security forces defend the base, but everyone can help ensure Edwards Air Force Base is safe and sound through the Air Force Office of Special Investigations Eagle Eyes program. Law enforcement officers rely on the eyes and ears of the entire community. If Airmen or citizens notice anything out of the norm or suspicious, either...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Brad White

Winter fire safety tips

Air Force photograph by Brad White The aftermath of a resident fire in the Edwards AFB housing area last month. Recently, Edwards AFB encountered a fire in the housing area that could have been devastating to all involved. The ...
 
 
smoke-out

2014 Great American Smokeout Nov. 20

Join Edwards AFB and the American Cancer Society in observing the Great American Smokeout Nov. 20. All employees are invited to join in this observance, by setting a quit day, or by supporting your colleagues on this day. Sta...
 

 
Air Force photograph by Rebecca Amber

Guest speaker motivates at ‘DREAM’ team luncheon

Air Force photograph by Rebecca Amber Eric Lipp, founder and executive director of the Open Doors Organization, shared his story at the Edwards AFB Disability Rights Employment Awareness Luncheon at Club Muroc Oct. 28. (U.S. Ai...
 
 

Step up to better health with AFMC’s challenge

Do you have ‘sitting disease’? Too much time sitting down may put you at risk for health problems. When muscles don’t contract, they require less fuel, and the surplus of sugar that accumulates in the bloodstream contributes to health concerns. Research has shown that sitting for long periods of time – watching TV or at...
 
 

Nurturing relationships and a culture of caring*

When life gets challenging, stressors can build and conflicts can escalate, sometimes leading to abuse. Preventing domestic abuse is fundamental to basic relationship maintenance. Partners in healthy relationships work together every day to nurture their relationship, taking care to address issues and concerns when they occur. Healthy relationships should be safe, respectful and positive. Octob...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>