Commentary

October 5, 2012

Myths, facts about people with disabilities

October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month.

This national campaign is intended to raise awareness about disability employment issues and celebrate the many and varied contributions of America’s workers with disabilities.

This year’s theme is “A Strong Workforce is an Inclusive Workforce: What Can YOU Do?” As employers strive to create an inclusive workforce, it is important to be aware of the myths that serve as roadblocks and interfere with the ability of persons with disabilities to have equality in employment. Listed below are some common myths and the facts that tell the real story.

 

MYTH: Hiring employees with disabilities increases workers compensation insurance rates.

FACT: Insurance rates are based solely on the relative hazards of the operation and the organization’s accident experience, not on whether workers have disabilities.

 

MYTH: Employees with disabilities have a higher absentee rate than employees without disabilities.

FACT: Studies by firms such as DuPont show that employees with disabilities are not absent any more than employees without disabilities.

 

MYTH: Persons with disabilities are inspirational, courageous and brave for being able to overcome their disability.

FACT: Persons with disabilities are simply carrying on normal activities of living when they drive to work, go grocery shopping, pay their bills or compete in athletic events.

 

MYTH: Persons with disabilities need to be protected from failing.

FACT: Persons with disabilities have a right to participate in the full range of human experiences including success and failure. Employers should have the same expectations of, and work requirements for, all employees.

 

MYTH: Persons with disabilities have problems getting to work.

FACT: Persons with disabilities are capable of supplying their own transportation by choosing to walk, use a car pool, drive, take public transportation or a cab. Their modes of transportation to work are as varied as those of other employees.

 

MYTH: Persons who are deaf make ideal employees in noisy work environments.

FACT: Loud noises of a certain vibratory nature can cause further harm to the auditory system. Persons who are deaf should be hired for all jobs that they have the skills and talents to perform. No person with a disability should be prejudged regarding employment opportunities.

 

MYTH: Considerable expense is necessary to accommodate workers with disabilities.

FACT: Most workers with disabilities require no special accommodations and the cost for those who do is minimal or much lower than many employers believe. Studies by the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s Job Accommodation Network have shown that 15 percent of accommodations cost nothing, 51 percent cost between $1 and $500, 12 percent cost between $501 and $1,000, and 22 percent cost more than $1,000.

Editor’s note: Information provided by the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Holiday reflection illuminates successful year

Despite the increased activity the holiday season often brings, this time of year also presents an opportunity for reflection. I would like to thank all AFMC personnel for your exceptional dedication and professionalism in meeting our mission of equipping our Air Force for world dominant airpower. I also thank your families and loved ones for...
 
 

Holiday message from 412th CC

Team, The holidays are here and Debbie and I would like to express our sincere thanks to each and every one of you who continue to make the 412th Test Wing the premier Air Force enterprise to work for and Edwards the best base to be stationed. We continue to be amazed at all your...
 
 

Tis the season to drink responsibly

It’s that time of year when holiday parties and late night celebrations begin to fill our calendars and we look forward to spending time with family and friends to celebrate our own special reasons for the season. Every Christmas Eve, I celebrate my life and I give thanks for being able to share the holiday...
 

 

Finding lifeís new direction after a loss

Sometimes it takes a difficult situation in your life to not only be reminded of the things you are truly grateful for, but also to serve as a catalyst for change. That moment for me came during the beginning of 2012 when my mother died suddenly at just 43 years old. We had just finished...
 
 

Gaining Altitude – Growth Opportunities for the Week

Through our character – an opportunity to reflect on important issues in our community - Next week the celebration of Hanukkah begins. This eight-day celebration is also known as the Festival of Lights and/or the Feast of Dedication. It is holiday that celebrates the re-dedication of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean...
 
 

Sexual assault everyone’s business

I walked in the bathroom and blood was everywhere. It looked like a murder scene. I looked up and there she was sitting on the toilet hunched over and crying. When I asked what happened she didn’t respond. She couldn’t talk. I was terrified and confused as to what happened. Why was she bleeding so...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>