Commentary

October 12, 2012

Did you know?

Tags:
Chief Master Sgt. Brian Randolph
412th Test Wing command chief


As the new 412th Test Wing command chief I have been taking time to get to know and talk with you while visiting your units and attending base events. I hope I get a chance to talk with all of you.
During my visits I am asked several questions. Some of these questions I can answer on the spot, some take more research and thought, and still others deserve an answer for all to hear. These are the questions I want to address in this and future articles called “Did you know?”

“What are we supposed to do when Reveille or Retreat sounds?”

Answer: Flags on stationary flagstaffs are only saluted during Reveille, Retreat, or special ceremonies. In these cases, when outside and in uniform, consistent with safety and mission requirements, stop what you are doing, face the direction of the flag (if visible) or the music. When outside in uniform, if the flag is being lowered or raised, or “To the Colors” or the national anthem is played, face the flag (if visible) or face the music and stand at attention and salute on the first note of the music.

If there is no music, salute when you see the flag first being raised or lowered. Drop your salute after the last note is played, or when the flag has been fully raised or lowered, depending on the ceremony (during the playing of “Sound Retreat,” which precedes the lowering of the flag, stand at parade rest). Stand at parade rest during the sounding of Retreat, which precedes the lowering of the flag, then come to attention and render a salute on the first note of the national anthem or “To the Colors.” If you are driving a vehicle, stop if consistent with safety and mission requirements. You and your passengers should sit quietly until the music ends (AFI 1-1 paragraph 1.6.2.4). All sporting or physical training activities will stop during Reveille (if the flag is being raised) and Retreat with proper honors to the flag being showed (AFI 34-1201 paragraph 8.1.6.2).

The above answer, I believe, requires a bit more explanation so please bear with me as I explain further. Clearly the context of the above answer is written for active duty military. For those of us on active duty, we must follow these customs and courtesies and correct all other active duty members who don’t follow them. As leaders we do not have a choice.

Obviously then, the next question is this: How does our civilian and contractor populace show the proper respect during Reveille or Retreat?

Answer: In 1812, Reveille was a drum call, but as time passed it came to mark when the flag was raised in the morning and honors paid to it. Since it is no longer only a call for Soldiers to rise in the morning, it is proper for all military and civilian personnel to afford honors to the flag during these ceremonies. Civilians and military members in civilian clothes should place their right hand over their heart. Vehicles in motion should stop.

If in a vehicle during Reveille (if the flag is being raised) or Retreat, pull the car to the side of the road safely and stop. All occupants should sit quietly at attention until the last note of the music has played or the flag is fully raised or lowered. All sporting or physical training activities will stop during Reveille (if the flag is being raised) and Retreat with proper honors to the flag. Members of the Armed Forces and veterans who are present but not in uniform may render the military salute when outdoors. This is true for hoisting, lowering or passing of the Unites States Flag and the national anthem. All others stand at attention and place your right hand over your heart. Civilians wearing hats should remove them and place it over their hearts during the national anthem. If your base flies the U.S. flag a continuous 24-hours with no music, or Reveille is played with no action with the flag, you are not required to stop and salute. Reveille is just a bugle call. Retreat is much the same. The playing of the national anthem or “To the Colors” is what requires proper honors to be displayed to the flag. (AFI 34-1201 paragraph 8.1.6.2)

Civilians, contractors, active duty, reserve, guard and military dependents are all “Airmen” and as such belong to a family – the Air Force Family. Being a member of any family comes with a measure of responsibility. I hope you all would agree some of that responsibility is showing the proper respect for our United States Flag and national anthem. While driving a vehicle on base, safely stop and sit quietly until the music ends. While walking outside on base in civilian clothing, stand and place your right hand over your heart. It’s the right thing to do.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

2015 Memorial Day message from 412th TW/CC

Team Edwards, Thank you for the outstanding welcome!†These past two months have been dynamic and exciting and I am honored to work with each and every one of you.†I truly appreciate your dedicated service and tireless efforts spent developing the needed capabilities for our Air Force and joint partners. This is my third assignment here...
 
 

This Memorial Day, reflect on true meaning

It was nearly 150 years ago that our nation first observed a day of remembrance for those who died in service to the United States of America. Over the years, more than one million American Soldiers, Sailors, Coast Guardsmen, Marines and Airmen have given their lives in defense of our great nation. We owe our...
 
 

Through our character – an opportunity to reflect on important issues in our community

- Memorial Day is a time to remember the men and women who died while serving in the country’s armed forces.  These brave Americans are part of a tradition of sacrifice, a theme highlighted in a recent book by Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz and Washington Post reporter Rajiv Chandrasekaran called “For Love of Country: What...
 

 
Untitled-1

What’s your social thumbprint?

U.S. Air Force graphic by Staff Sgt. Jessica Hines Just as you would lock the front door of your home or secure your wallet, social media users should aim to lockup and secure their online personal information and do regular ch...
 
 

Have you really joined the Air Force yet?

JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON, Alaska–For those of us in uniform, particularly enlisted members, memories of how we came to be in the military are fairly easy to call to mind – whether the process was more than 20 years ago, or closer to 20 months ago. As I recall the experience, that trip to the Military...
 
 

Through our character – an opportunity to reflect on important issues in our community

“What do you do?”  That is the question most asked of people when they meet for the first time.  It implies that we are what we do. But deep down we know we are more than our job. Our character, personality, hobbies, and family life are not often considered when we meet. It would be...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>