Commentary

October 26, 2012

Disability Employment Awareness Month: Ten Commandments of Etiquette for communicating with people with disabilities

The following Ten Commandments of Etiquette will help you communicate more effectively with people with disabilities.

 

1. When talking with a person with a disability, use eye contact and speak directly to that person rather than through a companion or sign language interpreter.

 

2. When introduced to a person with a disability, it is appropriate to offer to shake hands. People with limited hand use or who wear an artificial limb usually can shake hands. (Shaking hands with the left hand is an acceptable greeting.)

 

3. When meeting a person who is visually impaired, always identify yourself and others who may be with you. When conversing in a group, remember to identify the person to whom you are speaking.

 

4. If you offer assistance, wait until the offer is accepted. Then listen to or ask for instructions.

 

5. Treat adults as adults. Address people who have disabilities by their first names only when extending the same familiarity to all others. Never patronize people who use wheelchairs by patting them on the head or shoulder.

 

6. A wheelchair is part of the personal body space of the person who uses it. Leaning on a person’s wheelchair is similar to leaning on a person and is generally considered inappropriate.

 

7. Listen attentively when you’re talking with a person who has difficulty speaking. Be patient and wait for the person to finish, rather than correcting or speaking for the person. If necessary, ask short questions that require short answers, a nod or shake of the head. Never pretend to understand if you are having difficulty in doing so. Instead, repeat what you have understood and allow the person to respond.

 

8. When speaking with a person who uses a wheelchair or a person who uses crutches, place yourself at eye level in front of the person to facilitate the conversation.

 

9. To get the attention of a person who is deaf, tap the person on the shoulder or wave your hand. Look directly at the person and speak clearly, slowly and expressively to determine if the person can read your lips. Be sensitive to those who lip read by placing yourself so that you face the light source and keeping hands and food away from your mouth when speaking.

 

10. Relax. Don’t be embarrassed if you use common expressions – such as “See you later” or “Did you hear about that?” – that seem to relate to the person’s disability. It’s okay to ask questions when you’re unsure of what to do.

 




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