Commentary

October 26, 2012

Disability Employment Awareness Month: Ten Commandments of Etiquette for communicating with people with disabilities

The following Ten Commandments of Etiquette will help you communicate more effectively with people with disabilities.

 

1. When talking with a person with a disability, use eye contact and speak directly to that person rather than through a companion or sign language interpreter.

 

2. When introduced to a person with a disability, it is appropriate to offer to shake hands. People with limited hand use or who wear an artificial limb usually can shake hands. (Shaking hands with the left hand is an acceptable greeting.)

 

3. When meeting a person who is visually impaired, always identify yourself and others who may be with you. When conversing in a group, remember to identify the person to whom you are speaking.

 

4. If you offer assistance, wait until the offer is accepted. Then listen to or ask for instructions.

 

5. Treat adults as adults. Address people who have disabilities by their first names only when extending the same familiarity to all others. Never patronize people who use wheelchairs by patting them on the head or shoulder.

 

6. A wheelchair is part of the personal body space of the person who uses it. Leaning on a person’s wheelchair is similar to leaning on a person and is generally considered inappropriate.

 

7. Listen attentively when you’re talking with a person who has difficulty speaking. Be patient and wait for the person to finish, rather than correcting or speaking for the person. If necessary, ask short questions that require short answers, a nod or shake of the head. Never pretend to understand if you are having difficulty in doing so. Instead, repeat what you have understood and allow the person to respond.

 

8. When speaking with a person who uses a wheelchair or a person who uses crutches, place yourself at eye level in front of the person to facilitate the conversation.

 

9. To get the attention of a person who is deaf, tap the person on the shoulder or wave your hand. Look directly at the person and speak clearly, slowly and expressively to determine if the person can read your lips. Be sensitive to those who lip read by placing yourself so that you face the light source and keeping hands and food away from your mouth when speaking.

 

10. Relax. Don’t be embarrassed if you use common expressions – such as “See you later” or “Did you hear about that?” – that seem to relate to the person’s disability. It’s okay to ask questions when you’re unsure of what to do.

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

News Briefs September 19, 2014

Enlisted Combat Dining out There will be an Edwards AFB Enlisted Combat Dining Out Oct. 10. Check in time is 5:30 p.m. in Hangar 1600. The authorized uniform is any present or past combat uniform. The event is open to all Edwards enlisted. Bring your own water guns. Water and water bombs will be supplied....
 
 
retreat1

Retreat

Air Force photograph by Jet Fabara (From right to left) 1st Lt. Tony Liu, from the Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center Detachment 1, salutes the American flag as 1st Lt. Michael Eibling, from the U.S. Air Force Tes...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Bobbi Zapka

67 years of air power

Air Force photograph by Bobbi Zapka In keeping with tradition, Brig. Gen. Michael Brewer, 412th Test Wing commander and highest ranking officer attending the dinner, cuts the U.S. Air Force birthday cake with Airman Juan Bonill...
 

 
Navy photograph

Triton has first cross-country flight from Palmdale

Northrop Grumman photograph The MQ-4C Triton Unmanned Aircraft System takes off from Northrop Grummanís Palmdale, Calif., facility Sept. 17 for its first cross-country flight to Naval Air Station Patuxent, River, Md. PALMDALE,...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Jet Fabara

Base, local helping agencies team up to build ‘Community of Caring’

Air Force photograph by Jet Fabara Nancy Koch-Castillo, 412th Test Wing community support coordinator, leads the Edwards Air Force Base Integrated Delivery System monthly meeting Sept. 11 during a visit to Healing Horses and Ar...
 
 

Airmen must revalidate dependents by Dec. 31

By Dec. 31, every Airman will be required to provide their servicing finance office with documentation for all dependents as part of Air Force audit readiness efforts. This one-time, Air Force-wide recertification process will allow the Air Force to validate Airmen’s basic allowance for housing entitlements, ensuring every dollar of the $5.4 billion the Air...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>