Commentary

January 18, 2013

Resiliency = optimism

Now that we have entered a New Year what goals do you dare to achieve? What kind of attitude will you portray?

Most of you have heard 90 percent of what we accomplish in life is based on our attitudes.

Acknowledging your future endeavors coincides with resiliency which involves being adaptable, flexible and intelligent. Your first objective is realizing who you are and what you want to do.

Throughout life there are setbacks, challenges and personal losses we all deal with. The trick is to get through the setbacks and eventually move on. Examples are: losing a job, a family member, getting divorced, not getting your choice assignment, living with an illness, dealing with an injury from a deployment or surviving a natural disaster.

Resiliency is the process of adapting positively in the face of adversity, trauma, tragedy or even significant sources of stress – such as family and relationship problems, serious health issues, or workplace and financial situations. People who have learned resiliency can “bounce back” from difficult experiences. Studies have shown that resilience is more often ordinary, not extraordinary.

In order to get from your beginning point to your endpoint you need to have the desire to make realistic goals and follow through with a step by step process of achieving them. You need to have a positive outlook about yourself and where you are in your life at that moment in time; hence the word “optimism.” Allowing yourself to be an optimist enables you to expect good things to happen in your life. You will also need to have the proper skills to communicate and problem solve with others around you. Finally, you will need to be able to manage your feelings and impulses so they do not get in the way of achieving your goals.

 

“Only through experience of trial and suffering can the soul be strengthened, ambition inspired, and success achieved.” – Helen Keller

 




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