Commentary

May 10, 2013

Getting back to basics; Following standards on base

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MSgt Christy Anderson
Nellis AFB, Nev.

basics-edit
I was in the office and a staff sergeant I work with noticed someone walking across a parking lot to the flight kitchen with no hat and no blouse on. I was shocked at what I saw. So much so, I left the office and went into the flight kitchen to let this person know that he must wear his hat and blouse.

There is an authorized no-hat area between Bldg. 285 and the flight kitchen’s eastern entrance. This no-hat area is restricted to walking from Bldg. 285’s north side doors of the flightline-specific gate entryway. I couldn’t find anything that says you can have your blouse off.

It’s been amazing to me how some people don’t follow the most basic of standards, and we need to get back to the basics.

Being in the military and abiding by the rules isn’t difficult. Most of us had rules growing up, and knowing what the rules and regulations are will save you from the embarrassment of my next story.

I occasionally go with Airmen that are taking their fitness assessment. One morning I went with a chief master sergeant and couldn’t believe how many people did not know what to do when reveille sounded.

I stood in a sea of Airmen at attention as soon as the music began to play.

When reveille sounds you should be at parade rest. After reveille has played, on the first note of the national anthem or “To the Colors,” you snap to attention and salute. Hold your salute until the last note of the music is played. This is in the Professional Development Guide, and it’s very easy to find. If you don’t have a PDG, get with your first sergeant and get one. It is an easy reference for some very simple rules and guidelines.

Another issue that has been repeatedly noticed by our leadership on base is not saluting staff cars.

Make sure you are always aware when you’re walking around base. We have staff cars and need to salute them when we see them. Putting your head down while walking is not an excuse not to render the proper courtesy to the USAF Warfare Center commander and his vice commander, wing commanders and their vice commanders and group commanders driving their staff cars. I would much rather be the person that looks sharp saluting the staff car than the one the person driving the staff car stops to remind of what her or she is supposed to do. Believe me, the driver will stop the car, and I’m sure it won’t be pleasant.

We represent something bigger and have a responsibility to adhere by our Air Force Instructions which are all easily found online. I put in some crazy stuff in search engines and get answers or at least a direction to go. So remember to wear your uniform correctly and wear it proudly. Follow customs and courtesies as they are what define us.

We are different, not everyone wears this uniform and it makes us stand out. Always be aware of your surroundings, every good warrior knows what’s going on around them and you never know when someone is watching. I’m proud to be a member of this Air Force, and you should be too!




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