Commentary

June 14, 2013

Why enforce the standards

Master Sgt. Vincent Brass
8th Operations Group first sergeant

KUNSAN AIR BASE, South Korea -†In the military we constantly refer to “the standard.” Most standards are developed within Air Force instructions or technical orders.†They are what sets us apart from our civilian counterparts.

Webster’s dictionary defines a standard as “something established by authority, custom, or general consent as a model, or example.” We weigh our performance reports and sometimes administrative actions off of our ability to meet the standard.

As a first sergeant, I consistently find myself reminding Air Force members from all Air Force specialty codes of the standards. Most times I get a similar response; the member corrects the action and continues on.

Sometimes I get asked, “Shirt, is it really that big of a deal to have my hands in my pockets?” I ask you, is it?

What or whom will be impacted by the staff sergeant or captain with their hands in their pockets?
Honestly, probably no one.

Ultimately, what it comes down to is, which standard is†OK to deviate from? The Air Force uniform standard, Air†Force instruction 36-2903, was developed to provide us with guidance on how to maintain a professional image at all times.

How we wear our uniform is not only important to how the population of our great nation views us, but also how we pay respect to the men and women who have worn it before us and will continue to wear it long after we are all gone.

In my humble opinion, there should be no standard too small to enforce. Whether it is in a uniform standard, a security forces instruction, or a technical order that tells our maintainers the correct torque specification to prevent catastrophic failure while our pilots are in flight; all standards are developed to ensure mission success.

One of my mentors in the Air Force, retired Chief Master Sgt. Atticus Smith, used to put it to me in a manner that has stuck with me ever since.

“When we begin to pick and choose what standards we will enforce, we begin to accept mediocrity as the standard,” Smith said. “When mediocrity becomes the standard is when the mission will fail.”

I ask you now, why is it a big deal to enforce the standard?




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

News Briefs January 30, 2015

Annual awards The 412th Test Wing Annual Awards is Feb. 13 at Club Muroc. Cocktails will be served starting at 5 p.m. The theme for this year is “Back to the Future.” Limited tickets are available for nominees and commanders now. The rest of the tickets will be made available to the base Feb. 4....
 
 

Overcoming failures

You will fail. The question is, how will you respond? This reminds me of a parable of the carrot, egg and coffee. A senior airman was distraught when he learned he did not make staff sergeant after his first time testing. His staff sergeant supervisor saw a teaching opportunity and the next day he filled...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Jet Fabara

AFFT Museum acquires ‘up-lifting’ aircraft

Air Force photograph by Jet Fabara Air Force Flight Test museum curators and volunteers have dedicated a section of the museum to highlight NASA’s flight test accomplishments at Edwards, and to complement the latest tempo...
 

 

Love is in bloom with fresh flowers for your Valentine at the Edwards Exchange

As Valentine’s Day approaches, the Edwards Exchange is helping love blossom with fresh floral bouquets available for pickup in the Main Store and Express. Fresh flowers, including roses, will arrive Feb. 12 for Valentine’s Day weekend. “Picking up a fresh bouquet for someone special is as simple as visiting the Exchange,” said General Manager Charles...
 
 
af-marathon

USAF Marathon to increase price in February

If you’re planning on running in the Air Force Marathon this September, time is running out to take advantage of current pricing. The Marathon staff notes that prices will increase on Feb. 2. “We traditionally exper...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Jonathan Case

F-22 pilot reaches 1,000 flight hours

Lockheed Martin photograph by David Henry Steve Rainey, Lockheed Martin F-22 chief test pilot flew his 1,000th hour in an F-22 Raptor, Jan. 22, 2015. Four-year-old Steve Rainey sat on the hood of his father’s car at a loc...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>