Commentary

July 19, 2013

CMSAF Letter to Airmen – Developmental special duties

Tags:
James A. Cody
Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force

cmsaf
Fellow Airmen,
Much has happened over the past 5 1/2 months since I’ve taken the reigns as your Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force.

We’ve faced and will continue to face some very significant challenges, none the less each of you continue to do amazing things day in and out to accomplish the mission … Thank You.

In my initial letter to Airmen I spoke about the importance of deliberate development. We’ve been looking at the development of each of you from the Training, Education and Experience perspectives. The focus of this specific effort looked at ensuring we have the right enlisted Airmen in the right Special Duties both inside and outside their primary career fields. These positions have been designated as “Developmental Special Duties.”

Going forward, we will adjust the way we select Airmen for these positions. These developmental special duties are critical to the health and development of our enlisted force.

They include First Sergeants, Career Assistance Advisers, Military Training Instructors, Military Training Leaders, Professional Military Education Instructors, Recruiters, Academy Military Training NCOs, AF Honor Guard NCOs, and Airmen and Family Readiness NCOs as well as Specialty Training Instructors identified with a T-prefix.

These positions impact Airmen at every level, from the moment they first step on Lackland Air Force Base to the latter stages of a distinguished Air Force career. We must ensure the right Airmen are in these special positions. We must get this right.

We will now fill these positions through a nominative process. Commanders will nominate their best performers, and personnel teams will work with career field leaders to ensure we select the right people and right numbers for these opportunities. I understand and anticipate that many of our sharpest Airmen will continue to raise their hand for these developmental special duties. I encourage those Airmen to let their leadership know if they are interested, however it in no way guarantees a nomination as only the best will be considered.

A nomination to a developmental special duty assignment is an honor – it expresses a commander’s confidence in an Airmen. At the same time, it ensures our very best Airmen are in the position to deliberately develop our enlisted force and will return these Airmen to their career fields with greater experience under their belt.

Our Air Force continues to evolve and we must ensure our processes keep pace.† We are extremely proud of all the Airmen who have successfully served and serve today in these special duties. This process will ensure we continue to meet the needs of our Air Force and Airmen.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Perils of being ‘not-so-innocent’ bystander

I was accused of sexual assault. Even after 21 years, it’s still not easy to admit that. It was 1993, and I was a young airman basic at Lowry Air Force Base, Colo. I was in technical school, learning how to be a U.S. Air Force photographer. My class consisted of eight male Airmen and...
 
 

Gaining Altitude – Growth Opportunities for the Week

Through our character – an opportunity to reflect on important issues in our community - The famous educator, writer, philosopher and theologian C. S. Lewis wrote in his book, The Four Loves: “To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything and your heart will be wrung and possibly broken. If you want to...
 
 

Do you ‘really’ know who you are talking to?

When you’re young, you don’t think much about online safety. At 19, I didn’t have a care in the world; I just wanted to meet new people. Little did I know my care-free attitude online would change my life forever. In January 2013, I made an account on a social media site my friends recommended....
 

 

Through our character – an opportunity to reflect on important issues in our communit

The Economist magazine wrote an article about how to achieve (or not achieve) success.  They recognized that the “biggest threat to their success may lie within. They [the CEOs] need to cultivate the art of seeing themselves as others see them.”  One executive, Kevin Sharer, the former boss of Amgen, a biotech company, kept a...
 
 

Nurturing relationships and a culture of caring

DOVER AIR FORCE BASE, Del. – When life gets challenging, stressors can build and conflicts can escalate, sometimes leading to abuse. Preventing domestic abuse is fundamental to basic relationship maintenance. Partners in healthy relationships work together every day to nurture their relationship, taking care to address issues and concerns when they occur. Healthy relationships should...
 
 

Taking a stand: Help win the fight against sexual assault

WASHINGTON – Just as Airmen broke the sound barrier and pioneered new paths to space, Airmen will pioneer new ways to prevent sexual assault in the Air Force. Preventing this crime is not easy; if it were, you, Americaís Airmen, would already have eliminated it from our force. As we begin this new fiscal year,...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>