Air Force

August 16, 2013

Our Airman’s Creed

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Master Sgt. David A. Kolcun
7th Maintenance Group

Creed-New
DYESS AIR FORCE BASE, Texas – Gen. T. Michael Moseley, the 18th Chief of Staff of the Air Force, introduced the Airman’s Creed on April 18, 2007.

It provides Airmen a tangible statement of beliefs that we cherish. The Airman’s Creed was not created to regain some ideal that was lost or never otherwise identified, rather, it was created to focus on and recognize a spirit that transcends time from the past, to the present and into the future.

The Airman’s Creed echoes pride in the role of air, space, and cyberspace power and the Air Force’s commitment in supporting and defending the nation.

The creed is fueled by the Air Force’s heritage and a warfighting character that exists in all Airmen.
I believe the “Airman’s Creed ” serves as a vocal reminder of our spectacular combat heritage. Airmen of the past paved the runway for the Air Force warriors of the future. This creed articulates our storied past while providing a glimpse into our future. Airmen in the U.S. Air Force are the heart and soul of our unique fighting force and the creed captures that. It recognizes our historic achievements and signifies our unique contributions to fighting and winning America’s wars.

The Airman’s Creed, in its simplest form, is an obvious representation of what it means to be an Airman. It highlights the warrior spirit that is instilled in us from day-one of Basic Military Training. It sets forth a belief that Airmen are defenders of the American people and of freedom and justice all over the world. The creed summarizes an Airman’s responsibility to this nation, our mission in its defense, our unwavering dedication to the profession of arms and our undying loyalty to our fellow Airmen. The creed plainly and succinctly puts into words the warfighting spirit that exists in Airmen past and present. Our creed outlines the service’s core principle to fly, fight and win our nation’s wars.

We, as Airmen, embrace the notion that the Air Force is a combatant organization; the warrior philosophy abounds. The creed displays our warfighting ethos. Having a warfighting ethos is part of the Air Force’s soul, its makeup. It is woven into every flag draped upon an Airman’s coffin, it is present in every 21 gun salute performed at an Air Force funeral and it is displayed in every “missing man” formation flown by an Air Force aircraft. Our role in the fight is not simply support and the creed details this point. Airmen are spilling blood, sweat, and tears, and it comes at a great price. The creed captures our contribution to the overall security of this nation and our importance in the fight. It outlines my acceptance to bear the responsibility of upholding a legacy of valor while simultaneously forging a way ahead for others to follow.

The Airman’s Creed encapsulates what it means to be an Airman, to have pride in service and instills ownership of a warrior organization. This creed is about our people and a military service that is fundamentally different than any other service. The Airman’s Creed is about who we are, where we’ve come from and where we are going. It is about the pride we have as Airmen. It represents our word to remain dedicated to the American people as we have for many years. It is our word to stand by them and protect them no matter the cost. It is our word to do what is right. And after all, our word is our bond!




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