Commentary

August 30, 2013

Hold self to a higher standard in uniform

Lt. Col. Lynn Marshall
349th Mission Support Group

TRAVIS AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – The other day as I was driving home from base, I noticed an individual driving erratically, speeding and running red lights – just an ordinary California driver, right?

Sadly, I could clearly see that this individual was wearing an Air Force uniform. This incident made me contemplate a few questions on my continued drive home.

What does it mean to wear the United States Air Force uniform? Are your actions still an individual acting alone or have you transformed yourself into a representation of the entire military community?

The idea of disparaging or degrading the military and the uniform angers me as it should everyone who has been given the opportunity to wear one.

The uniform of the U.S. Air Force represents many honorable things. It stands for hope, peace, strength, discipline, perseverance, protection and, most of all, pride-pride in our country, heritage, flag and ourselves.

Your uniform identifies you as a member of the United States military. All military members are members of a uniformed service where discipline is judged, in part, by the manner in which they act in that uniform. Therefore, it is vital to uphold the high standards of discipline and order that are the hallmark of this great organization.

If a service member is in uniform when he or she gets drunk, shows too much public display of affection or uses profanity in public, that person is acting as a poor ambassador for the military.

The utmost confidence has been given to us by the American people, thus, we should hold and carry ourselves to a higher standard and wear the uniform with admiration.

We have earned the right to wear our military uniforms and we should be extremely proud to wear them.
So remember wear it with pride, you are representing the country that has given you the opportunity to serve it.




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