Local

September 13, 2013

Timing is everything: Ammo specialists unearth time capsule

Left to right: William Jones, Jon Wiggins and James McCaffrey remove items from a time capsule Sept. 9, in front of the 412th Maintenance Squadron Munitions Flight storage area. The time capsule was assembled and buried on Feb. 24, 1993, by all three while they were on active duty status with the then 6515th Munitions Maintenance Squadron, now civilians with 412th Maintenance Squadron. The time capsule opening was held to reveal the progression of ammo from then to now and to reflect on ammo history at Edwards.

 

In front of the 412th Maintenance Squadron Munitions Flight storage area there sits a plaque atop a desert-clad landscape with static bomb displays that reads:

Here lies the remains and remnants of past “Ammo Troops.”

Honor with dignity and respect.

“IYAAYAS.”

Sealed: 24 Feb 1993 – 1313 Hrs

Open: 13 Sept 2013 – 1313 Hrs

Approximately 15 feet below this plaque remained a time capsule that was assembled Feb. 24, 1993, by a group of military ammunition specialists from the then 6515th Munitions Maintenance Squadron at Edwards.

Nearly 20 years later, on Sept. 9, a couple of those same military specialists, now civilians, with the attendance of 412th Maintenance Squadron munitions personnel, were on hand to unearth that same time capsule buried years ago and reveal the progression of ammo from then to now and reflect on ammo history.

James Coppi (center), a 412th MXS munitions inspector, looks through photos that were extracted from a time capsule Sept. 9, 2013, and left by munitions specialists from the then 6515th Munitions Maintenance Squadron at Edwards. The time capsule opening was held to reveal the progression of ammo from then to now and to reflect on ammo history at Edwards.

“It’s always great to see how our career field has or has not changed in the past 20 years, and see what the ammo troops of 20 years thought was important then, what they held true to themselves and what they put into this time capsule,” said James Coppi, a 412th MXS munitions inspector. “It really gives anyone in the ammo career field that much more perspective, not only about the ammo career field, but the culture of what was occurring back then, to include pictures of what ammo was like. So, it was really interesting.”

Of those in attendance from the former squadron, James McCaffrey and Jon Wiggins were staff sergeants at the time of the capsule burial and William Jones was a senior airman, but they were all present in order to take part in the historical recovery they helped make possible 20 years ago.

“The chief at the time decided it was a good idea, so we put this together; we dug the hole and assembled the time capsule within an inert and hollow bomb in Bldg. 607, which at the time was conventional maintenance,” said Wiggins, a 412th MXS munitions controller. “I built the time capsule and then my crew buried it. We had a military formation and complete formal burial. It was really a big deal. Although, I truly didn’t believe I would actually be here to dig it up 20 years later.”

After the recovery was made, items within the rusted and weather-worn bomb included elements that current ammo specialists were able to see, remember and compare.

William Jones (left), the 412th MXS munitions accountable systems officer, holds up a Desert Wings issue from Feb. 5, 1993, that was extracted from a time capsule Sept. 9, 2013. The time capsule was assembled and buried by Jones and other munitions specialists from the then 6515th Munitions Maintenance Squadron at Edwards. The time capsule opening was held to reveal the progression of ammo from then to now and to reflect on ammo history at Edwards from 20 years ago.

“One of the letters we read from an actual technical order from this flight 20 years ago stated, ‘you guys are probably reading TOs off a computer now,’ and here we are now. The reality now is that everything is automated,” said Jones,┬áthe munitions accountable systems officer for the 412th MXS. “The reason we did this is because the ammo career field is a very tight-knit community and we just wanted to pass on our experiences from 20 years ago to future ammo troops to show them how we did things through the use of pictures, deployment badges, patches, letters to each other, technical orders, and other memorabilia.”

“The other thing this capsule showed is that although time and technology has changed, the process is still the same. The way to get to the end result may be a little different, but our determination and attention to detail on the job remain the same,” added Wiggins.

Prior to the unearthing, it took the munitions flight an hour and a half during the heat of day to dig up the capsule.

James McCaffrey, 412th MXS time changer manager, reads the plaque of the time capsule that was buried in front of the 412th Maintenance Squadron Munitions Flight storage area on Feb. 24, 1993, approximately 20 years ago. The time capsule was unearthed by McCaffrey and other 412th MXS personnel in order to compare the differences between the ammo career field then and now and to reflect on ammo history at Edwards.

“I was happy to be a part of this,” added McCaffrey, 412th MXS time changer manager. “Like Mr. Wiggins, I had no idea I’d be here 20 years later. I do recall, though, we all took turns polishing the plaque for a good 10 plus years, but the elements eventually got to it. Nonetheless, we wanted to hold to the time capsule’s open date, so this piece of ammo history really became part of ammo pride.”

“Initially, we were worried whether it had opened or leaked, and things in there were ruined but it sealed,” Jones said. “After an experience like this, who knows, we may just put some stuff in from 20 years ago and now and have the future ammo flight dig that capsule up 20 years from now. Altogether, today was a good day to be ammo.”

This is the original time capsule plaque created by munitions specialists with the then 6515th Munitions Maintenance Squadron. The time capsule was buried on Feb. 24, 1993 and unearthed Sept. 9, approximately 20 years later, by a few of the same personnel that were there to bury it.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
duck-blind2

Duck blind drawing slated for Aug. 8

Waterfowl hunters can participate in the annual duck blind drawing scheduled Aug. 8 at the Rod and Gun Activity, Bldg. 210. Base hunting permits may be submitted to drawing officials from 9 a.m. until the actual drawing begins,...
 
 

NASA’S American Eatery (Bldg. 4825)

Aug. 3-7 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday Beef taco salad Tuesday Lasagna Side salad and garlic bread Wednesday Country fried steak Mashed potatoes and gravy Vegetables Thursday Orange chicken Fried rice and egg roll Friday Baked cod Macaroni and cheese Broccoli All Blue Plate Specials — $7.89 Drink not included. Medium Beverage, $1.99; Large,...
 
 

Classes offered in August by Family Advocacy

The New Pregnancy Orientation & Dads4Dads Class 1 will take place 9:30-11:30 a.m., Aug. 6, in the Family Advocacy conference room at Bldg. 5513. This one session class will help all expectant parents to navigate their way through pregnancy. Participants will get information on the New Parent Support Program, steps to enroll their baby for...
 

 

News Briefs July 31, 2015

Blood drive The next American Red Cross Blood Drive at Edwards is 8 a.m.-2 p.m., Aug. 5 in the Chapel 1 Annex. Both walk-ins and appointments are accepted. Time slots go by very fast so please try to schedule your appointment quickly by contacting the following blood drive coordinators: Staff Sgt. Robert Torres at robert.torres.18@us.af.mil;...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Patric Lovato

New CC at AFOTEC Det. 1

Air Force photograph by Patric Lovato Maj. Gen. Matthew H. Molloy (left), Air Force Operational Test and Evaluation Center commander, poses for a photo with new AFOTEC Detachment 1 commander, Col. Steven M. Ross, after Ross acc...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Rebecca Amber

Railway company boards Edwards’ tracks

Air Force photograph by Rebecca Amber A BNSF Railway locomotive arrives at Edwards to retrieve a baretable train that was stored on Edwards AFB’s railroad tracks.   If you travelled through the North Gate recently, y...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>