Health & Safety

November 1, 2013

AFI change simplifies fitness appeal process

Debbie Gildea
JB San Antonio-Randolph, Texas

Airmen who fail their fitness assessment now may appeal to their wing commanders rather than submit an appeal to the Air Force Board for Corrections of Military Records, Air Force Personnel Center officials said.

The appeal process change is one of several updates to Air Force Instruction 36-2905, Air Force Fitness Program, that went into effect Oct. 21. In addition, the AFI reintroduces the body mass index measurement for Airmen who fail the abdominal circumference component, changes to the walk test, and adjusts the required score for Airmen who are assessed on only one fitness component.

The appeal process change corrects a policy that generated hundreds of unnecessary requests to the BCMR, which in turn resulted in longer wait times for Airmen, said Senior Master Sgt. Kreig Cressione, AFPC special programs branch.

Because of the high number of appeals, under the BCMR review process an Airman could have a 90-day or longer wait for a decision. Under the new appeal process, it could take a couple of weeks, or even days.

“The change is positive for everyone involved,”†Cressione†said. “Airmen don’t have to wait as long for a decision on their appeal, wing commanders have the authority to adjudicate their Airmen’s appeals, and the BCMR will be able to focus on other records that need review and correction.”

While many BCMR appeals were for administrative errors – mistyping a number – others were the result of illness or injury prior to the test. An administrative error can be quickly resolved, but a failure must be appealed, he explained.

“Failing the assessment because you’re ill or injured can’t be corrected without an appeal, so you need to tell the fitness assessment cell prior to testing if you don’t feel well or if you’re injured,” Cressione said. “You’ll have to see the doctor before you can be rescheduled for your assessment, but it’s better to reschedule than fail.”

In addition, Airmen injured during the fitness assessment should stop their test and tell the FAC. The FAC will refer them to the medical facility for evaluation and if a doctor validates the injury or illness, the unit commander can invalidate the fitness assessment. At that point, the test can be rescheduled.

If an Airman does fail the assessment for other than administrative reasons, the appeal process begins when the Airman submits a memorandum and supporting documents to the unit fitness program manager. The UFPM submits the appeal through the unit commander to the wing commander.

If the wing commander approves the appeal, the FAC is notified and the problem is resolved.

For requests that are disapproved, the Airman may appeal to AFPC for consideration under a new board process called the Fitness Assessment Appeal Board.

The FAAB will convene, as needed, at AFPC to review applications when an Airman requests a secondary review of their appeal. If the FAAB disapproves the Airman’s request, AFPC will notify and advise the Airman that the final appeal authority is the BCMR.

An Airman has up to two years from the date of a fitness assessment to appeal the result to the FAAB, but the process must begin with the assessment cell. The FAAB will not review a case that has not been reviewed by the wing commander, said Cressione.

For detailed instructions on appealing a fitness assessment score and information about†other personnel issues, visit the myPers website at https://mypers.af.mil.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Untitled-1

Scars of DUI: It ends with me

As a young child, you don’t think much if someone doesn’t show up when they’re supposed to because you have better, “more important” things to worry about; like bugs and dolls. They’re just a...
 
 

Comprehensive Airman Fitness update

Comprehensive Airman Fitness is comprised of resiliency skills taught to help enable Airmen to make sound choices within the four domains of total fitness, mental, physical, spiritual and social. On April 2, Air Force Instruction 90-506, Comprehensive Airman Fitness, was electronically published and made available to the total force. The new AFI established an exciting...
 
 
Air Force photograph by Jet Fabara

STOP, LISTEN, LOOK! Don’t Let it Happen to YOU!

Air Force photograph by Jet Fabara Senior Airman Tyler Stuart, 412th Operations Support Squadron Airfield Management Operations supervisor, demonstrates the proper way of contacting the air traffic control tower for clearance t...
 

 
Air Force photograph by Jet Fabara

Know your fireworks to make this July 4th safe

Air Force photograph by Jet Fabara This year’s Freedom Fest will be held July 4th beginning at 4:30 p.m. at Roberts and Wings Fields. Fireworks will begin at 9:30 p.m. Fireworks are synonymous with our celebration of Inde...
 
 

Preparing your home to be fire adapted

Wildfire season is in full effect with many states reporting significant wildfire activity. In California, fires have forced more than 20,000 people to be evacuated this year. In Texas, more than 75 homes were destroyed by wildfire. Fire departments nationwide are encouraging residents with wildfire risk to be actively preparing for the upcoming season with...
 
 

Motorcycle advanced rider course

The 412th Test Wing Safety Office is offering a motorcycle Advanced Rider Course for military only.  If you have taken the basic motorcycle course, it is mandatory to take the advanced course per AFI 91-207, Table 4.1.  Although the class is geared towards the sport bike rider, it is open to all two-wheeled riders (military...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>