NASA

July 25, 2014

NASA Armstrong Support Center receives LEED platinum certification

Large expanses of windows and curved rooflines highlight NASA Armstrong’s new Facilities Support Center. The 38,000-square-foot structure has been certified that it met the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design new construction platinum standard for environment and energy efficiency.

 
NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center’s new Facilities Support Center at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., has been certified platinum, the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design’s highest standard for long-term sustainability.

LEED certification, which is determined by the U.S. Green Building Council, recognizes the best strategies for energy reduction and conservation. The certification marks Armstrong’s first platinum-rated building. NASA policy requires all new buildings to be certified to the LEED silver level or higher.

“The CITC (Consolidated Information Technology Center) was our first LEED-certified building, which achieved a silver rating in October 2013,” said NASA Armstrong center director David McBride. “The FSC achieved platinum. This is another step in NASA’s goal to establish more sustainable infrastructure. This facility also raises the bar for our future construction projects and is a part of the center’s master plan,” he added.

The $12.7 million, 38,000-square-foot FSC building incorporates energy and water conservation, solar energy and recycled materials. The $8.8 million, 22,000-square-foot CITC also was NASA’s first LEED-certified data center. The architectural firm Development One, based in Santa Ana, California, designed both structures.

NASA Armstrong architect and Facilities Support Center project manager Gemma Flores outlines where various center organizations are located in the new building to Armstrong information technology security specialist Brent Mead during an open house earlier this year.

“Energy conservation is the most outstanding feature of the new Facilities Support Center,” said Dan Mullen, Armstrong energy conservation manager. “We estimate that we will see a 46 percent reduction in energy consumption versus a standard building of this type.”

The new building is a result of the center’s organizations puling together, said Gemma Flores, Armstrong’s FSC project manager.

“The success of the Facilities Support Center project, from the planning, design, construction, activation and finally achieving LEED platinum certification, is due to the dedicated collaboration of a number of Armstrong organizations,” Flores said. “Their diligence led to project success and has given the center efficiencies that benefit the center’s mission through innovation, implementing cutting-edge elements and making environmentally conscious decisions.”

The FSC uses the sun to offset overall energy costs by more than 17 percent, Flores said. The facility also uses a combination of natural light that is distributed by solar light tubes to illuminate many areas and light-emitting diodes, or LED, lighting fixtures.

Water usage was another key component in the FSC’s design, where elements combine to use about 40 percent less than standard construction, Flores added. Most of the landscaping requires water for only a short time until it matures. Water used from showers, laundry and restroom sinks – called gray water – is collected in a tank, filtered and pumped back into the facility for use in flushing toilets.

LED lighting provides a warm glow to the front entrance of the new Facilities Support Center at NASA Armstrong at dusk. The entire 38,000-square-foot structure is lit by light-emitting diode fixtures, which consume only a tiny fraction of the electricity used by conventional florescent lights.

FSC landscaping uses drought-tolerant plants such as ocotillo, agave and desert willow and gravel for ground cover, Flores said. The facility also features water-efficient plumbing fixtures.

Even during the building’s construction phase, conservation was in focus. About 95 percent of the construction waste was recycled and more than 20 percent of its construction materials were made from recycled products, Mullen explained. For example, all of the wall and ceiling insulation was made from recycled denim. In addition, countertops were made from wheat board, considered a rapidly renewable material, Flores added.

Aeronautical elements and surrounding historical buildings and hangars inspire the overall design of the facility. The curved shape of the roofline was designed to resemble the curves of aircraft wings and the front facade reflects the look of NASA Armstrong’s Hangar 4802. The curved surfaces also offer advantages in reflecting natural light to illuminate major work areas, Flores explained. The FSC design also incorporated the use of translucent wall panels and low-energy-transfer windows that allow light to pass through while blocking heat and cold.

The FSC includes collaborative office space, conference rooms, restrooms, shower/changing facilities, fabrication workshops, development and training laboratories and a storage mezzanine.

Comfort and Hays Electric Inc. of Long Beach, Calif., and its subcontractors built the facility.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Separated but not alone

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho–As the dawn broke out over the mountains, I woke up to the sun peeping through my window. Once I got up I went straight to the kitchen to make my family breakfast yet in the back of my mind, all I could think about was, how am I going...
 
 
duck-blind2

Duck blind drawing slated for Aug. 8

Waterfowl hunters can participate in the annual duck blind drawing scheduled Aug. 8 at the Rod and Gun Activity, Bldg. 210. Base hunting permits may be submitted to drawing officials from 9 a.m. until the actual drawing begins,...
 
 
LPGA1

Free golf clinics with LPGA tour player

Air Force photographs by Rebecca Amber Ladies Professional Golf Association tour player Stephanie Louden demonstrates how to correctly use three golf clubs, a wedge, a 7-iron and a driver during the free golf clinic July 24. Lo...
 

 

NASA’S American Eatery (Bldg. 4825)

Aug. 3-7 10:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday Beef taco salad Tuesday Lasagna Side salad and garlic bread Wednesday Country fried steak Mashed potatoes and gravy Vegetables Thursday Orange chicken Fried rice and egg roll Friday Baked cod Macaroni and cheese Broccoli All Blue Plate Specials — $7.89 Drink not included. Medium Beverage, $1.99; Large,...
 
 

Air Force promotes fatigue countermeasures

Human fatigue results from sleep deprivation. Fatigue has become a growing concern in the Air Force as sustained and continuous operations, along with global deployments, are stretching the ability of our forces to meet growing mission demands. Some Airmen may question whether fatigue is really a big enough hazard to worry about. Fatigue can decrease...
 
 
U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Chrissy Best

Losing sleep: CSAF shares what keeps him up at night

U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Chrissy Best Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III speaks with 501st Combat Support Wing Airmen during an all call at Royal Air Force Croughton, England, July 16. Welsh explained the...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>