Health & Safety

March 22, 2012

Army reinforces need for vehicle safety training

Amy Sunseri
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Soldiers are killed or injured across the Army on a daily basis in privately-owned vehicle and motorcycle accidents. That is why the Army is strengthening its Army Traffic Safety Training Program for all Army personnel.

“The training is established to reinforce a positive attitude toward driving, individual responsibility, and correct response to routine and emergency driving situations. Each progressive traffic safety training course builds on the previous module to reinforce the Army’s expectations for a safe Army driver,” according to Army regulation 11-7.

Fort Huachuca personnel offer six vehicle safety classes: Motorcycle Basic Rider, Motorcycle Experienced Rider and Motorcycle Military Sport Bike Rider, Motorcycle Refresher, Intermediate Driver and Remedial Driver Training Courses. These classes are offered monthly throughout the calendar year based on supply and demand, stated Daniel Orta, director, Installation Safety Office.

Motorcycle training is mandatory for all Soldiers who operate a motorcycle. Soldiers are required to complete motorcycle sustainment training every three years, which consists of, at a minimum, retaking an ERC or the MSRC. A Soldier can meet the sustainment training requirement, at no expense to the government, by taking an Army-approved advanced level motorcycle course.

BRC provides both classroom and hands-on motorcycle safety foundation training. Twelve students is the maximum per course for classroom sessions, with a minimum of six. The outdoor instruction includes no more than six students per instructor, with a maximum of 12 students with two instructors. This class is two days long.

The ERC training also provides both classroom and hands-on motorcycle training. Those who take this course must complete the BRC or a state-approved rider course prior to attending this class. Twelve students is the maximum per classroom session, and the minimum is six. This class is four hours long.

The Motorcycle Military Sport Bike Rider Course provides hands-on training for servicemembers who own and/or operate sport bikes in accordance with commercial practice. Students must provide their own sport bikes and must have completed a BRC or state-approved rider course prior to attending. Twelve students is the maximum per classroom session; the minimum number is six. MSRC is an eight-hour class.

MRT is a motorcycle refresher training for servicemembers who have been deployed for more than 180 days. Students must provide their own motorcycles, meet the requirements to ride on post, and possess a motorcycle training course completion card such as a BRC, MSRC or ERC. Class size is limited to 12 students, with a minimum of six. This course is two hours long.

“The majority of all motorcycle accidents are either due to speeding, not [being] trained or no helmet use,” explained Orta.

The Intermediate Driver Training Course reinforces the introduction to driver’s training provided separately to servicemembers during their advanced individual training. This class reinforces a positive attitude toward driving, individual responsibility, correct response to routine and emergency driving situations, and sharing the road safely with other road-users. Class size is limited to 30 students. IDC is a two-and-a-half-hour class.

Remedial Driver Training is a behavior modification/aggressive driving course for personnel identified as aggressive drivers. Its intent is to affect a driver’s behavioral change which results in reduction of motor vehicle accidents and related loss of life or limb. This training addresses high risk behaviors, helps drivers develop countermeasures to reduce negative driving habits and attitudes, and helps participants develop and strengthen positive driving habits and attitudes.

The desired outcome is that students will become more analytical about traffic situations, recognize how behavior and choices can influence situations, and understand facts and solutions about common factors affecting unsafe behavior, such as driving under the influence, anger, inexperience, fatigue, medications, et cetera. Class size is limited to 30 participants. RDT is an eight-hour class.

“We need to stress to Soldiers that making the right decision while riding or driving impacts all of us, and these motorcycle and POV classes help the Soldier by ensuring he or she is properly trained in the safeties and techniques involved [in] these operations as well as get [Soldiers] in the mindset or making informed decisions while on the road,” Orta added.

Those interested in taking classes must register online at https://apps.imcom.army.mil/AIRS/Home.aspx and select their desired course.

For more information, contact the Fort Huachuca Safety Office, 533.8373/0557.




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