Health & Safety

March 29, 2012

Live safely with bears on Fort Huachuca

Tags:
Mark McCabe
LO5S2040

Fort Huachuca is located in what is considered good black bear habitat. Bears are used to the area and capable of living here successfully without human intervention. However, occasionally bears will wander into the housing or other cantonment areas in search of an easy meal. People must be proactive to prevent dangerous bear interactions.

Bears are omnivorous, meaning they will eat plants and flesh. Natural food sources for black bears include: fruit, berries, nuts, carrion, small animals, grasses and even tree bark during the harshest times. In human settings, bears will eat garbage, dog food, bird seed and food people intentionally set out for animals. Once a bear learns where it can get an easy meal, it will likely return. To prevent bears from getting too close to home, people must take these few simple steps:

  • Leave garbage cans inside until the day of pick-up
  • Keep pets and pet food inside
  • Hang bird feeders at least eight feet off the ground
  • Keep barbeque grills clean
  • Pick ripe fruits and vegetables immediately
  • Do not intentionally feed wildlife “” it is illegal!

Natural resources on Fort Huachuca are abundant, more so than on areas outside installation boundaries. This makes the fort a favorable location for bears to live and roam in. Last summer’s Monument Fire may have pushed even more bears onto Fort Huachuca, which makes it even more important to follow the guidelines described above.

People who see a bear and believe it is a public nuisance should not approach it. Instead, contact the military police at 533.2181 or the environmental department at 533.8763. Yell, whistle or bang pans together in order to drive it away. Those who see a bear while hiking should alter their route to avoid it. If approached by a bear, make loud noises and make yourself look as large as possible by waving your arms, jacket or anything else you are carrying. Do not run. Keep your eyes on the bear and back away slowly.

Bears are an important part of Arizona’s diverse habitat, and many people consider witnessing a bear in its natural environment a rare and exciting event. By taking a few simple precautions, everyone can help to ensure there are no dangerous people-and-bear interactions.

A nuisance bear is usually condemned to death. Remember “” a fed bear is a dead bear!




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Gabrielle Kuholski

Antiterrorism Exercise assesses installation readiness, reinforces important relationships

Gabrielle Kuholski First responders with the Fort Huachuca and Whetstone Fire Departments work together to get a wounded Soldier into an ambulance during the full scale exercise, Apache Warrior 2013, Tuesday. These first respon...
 
 

Labor Day Safety Message

Labor Day marks the traditional end of the summer season and celebrates the American worker and the contributions they make to our great country. I want to commend you on your efforts to control heat injuries through another hot summer. Your diligence and care for teammates contributed to an overall 20-percent decrease in accident fatalities...
 
 
Gabrielle Kuholski

VA clinical psychologist raises military sexual trauma awareness

Gabrielle Kuholski Michael Moore, Ph.D., military sexual trauma coordinator at the Southern Arizona Veterans Affairs Health Care System in Tucson, presents a session on military sexual trauma, or MST, in the Murr Community Cent...
 

 

Glass recycling now available in Sierra Vista

SIERRA VISTA – Clean glass bottles and jars can be dropped off for recycling at the new Sierra Vista Glass Recycling Depot as part of the city’s trial glass recycling project. The Glass Recycling Depot, located in the parking lot of the Pedro Castro Government Maintenance Center, is a glass collection point that is separate...
 
 
Maranda Flynn

FH Community Spouses’ Club accepting new members, shares plans for coming year

Maranda Flynn Fort Huachuca Community Spouses’ Club board members, Katrina LaDue and Lesley Hocker, (left foreground and background), assist new club members, Dana Edwards and Sandi Weishaupt, (right foreground and background...
 
 

Retiree Council shares news, notes Did you forget to care for your Family?

No one forgets to care for his or her Family on purpose. It just happens – more often than one might think when it comes to the military Survivor Benefit Plan, or SBP. Most often, retired Soldiers don’t know the federal law and the time limits it imposes on maintaining their SBP elections. If a...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin