Health & Safety

May 3, 2012

Drivers asked to pitch in, reduce traffic violations

By Alton Dunham
Special to the Scout

A statistical rise in traffic violations during the first and second quarter of fiscal year 2012 is prompting Fort leadership to ask Huachuca drivers to do their part.

Traffic control device violations, such as running a traffic light or failing to stop at a posted stop sign were the biggest offenses with 146 motor vehicle operators cited in the second quarter. Excessive speeding, 10-20 miles per hour over the posted limit, followed closely with 141 motor vehicle operators cited. Speeding in general continues to rise, and second quarter statistics show both offenses have doubled. DUIs are also on the climb, with 19 offenders in the second quarter alone.
The target demographic most at risk in the first three months of the year was civilians and enlisted grades E-1 to E-6.

According to Fort Huachuca Regulation 190-5, which governs point assessments for moving traffic violations, a driver can be assigned up to four points for a traffic control device violation, and potentially five points for speeding up to 20 mph over the posted limit.  These point assessments add up, and an accumulation of 12 points within 12 months, or 18 points within 24 months can result in a suspension of driving privileges. A DUI can invoke an immediate suspension.

Along with a revocation of driving privileges, traffic violations on- and off-post impact individual, family and mission readiness. Court appearances, costly fines and career consequences are all part of a potential ripple effect for drivers who are caught.

The Directorate of Emergency Services is aggressively focusing on curtailing violations with an emphasis on speeding, DUIs and crosswalk safety, according to Sgt. Major Julius Gonzales, Provost sergeant major.

However, “even with an increased presence and warning citations, we are still seeing violators,” Gonzales noted.

The bottom line is that nearly all of these violations are avoidable by doing what is legally and morally right.

“Before you turn that key, think about it. It’s an individual responsibility, and as a Soldier or civilian, it’s a privilege to drive on post,” Gonzales said, warning that offenders who shirk their responsibility will lose this privilege.

In addition to following the letter of the law, there are other ways the community can pitch in. Upon request, command teams can ask traffic units to come to their organization and have law enforcement officers explain what they are looking for and the importance of driving safety. The fort is hosting an educational Safety Fair, free to the public, on May 11 at Barnes Field House. And, anyone who observes an unsafe act is encouraged to contact the Military Police Desk, 533.3000 to report a description of the vehicle, the driver and if possible, the license plate number.

Most importantly, Gonzales asks that individual drivers consider the serious implications of unsafe driving.

“You’re not just hurting yourself; you are endangering other people on the road. Think not just about your family, but think about the other person’s family that you could actually hit.”




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