Local

May 10, 2012

Commissary parking lot construction underway

Story and photos by Tanja Linton
Media Relations Officer

Demolition of the first half of the commissary parking lot construction project began Monday. The project is estimated to be completed by September.

The Commissary is getting a new parking lot which will not only better help serve store patrons, but will also be environmentally friendly.

The low impact design for the new commissary parking lot will not only make the area more attractive, it will also increase the number of parking spaces, capture six to eight acre-feet of storm water recharge and be more energy efficient.

The current parking lot is an old design with insufficient drainage that has been repaved many times.  During monsoon rains, customers frequently had to wade through up to two feet of water to reach the commissary entrance said Kim Mulhern, Environmental and Natural Resources Division chief at the Directorate of Public Works.

Mulhern and the DPW team came up with a new design which lowers the grading of the parking lot and has a series of medians with drainage areas that will capture water as it cascades down the lot and will be used to recharge the aquifer. Water from the commissary roof will also be captured for additional recharge. The gently sloping design and improved drainage will prevent the flooding that currently takes place during the rainy season.

A small rectangle of landscaping between the west corner of the current parking lot and commissary entrance already uses xeriscaping and native plants. When construction is completed, the entire strip will reflect this design.

Handicap parking space will be relocated to the lower end of the parking lot near the entrance. The new location of these spaces and the gentle slope of the parking lot means shoppers will have an easier time pushing heavily laden grocery carts to their vehicles. The entire area will also be used more effectively, increasing parking spaces from 204 to 263. The entrance to the commissary will remain the same.

The first phase of the project began Monday and is expected to be completed in mid-July. The other half of the parking lot will then be closed off for the second phase of the project with an estimated completion date of mid-September. Working in phases allows for some parking to be available in the current lot. The new parking lot will also be easier to negotiate with two-way traffic between parking aisles.

Parking at the commissary will be somewhat limited during construction. Shoppers will be able to park on one side of Burns, and overflow parking is available at the Barnes Field House parking lot. Fort officials ask motorists to be vigilant for shoppers using crossing at the intersection of Hatfield and Arizona during the construction phase.

“The $600K for the project comes from the garrison’s Sustainment Revitalization and Modernization Fund,” said Mulhern. “The Defense Commissary Agency has contributed funding for the plants,” she added.

Energy efficiencies will be gained with changes to the current mercury vapor lighting. New lighting poles will be lower and use LED lights. A timer that will keep the lights off when the commissary is closed and when there is sufficient sun to light the area will mean additional energy savings. Trees planted in the median will shade the area from the brutal desert sun and help lower temperatures.

Low impact, or green infrastructure as it is also called, is being increasingly used in the desert Southwest. Green infrastructure describes constructed features that use living, natural systems to provide environmental services, such as capturing and cleaning storm water; creating wildlife habitat; shading and cooling streets and buildings; and calming traffic. The median near the intersection of Christy and Smith on Fort Huachuca is an example of green infrastructure. In addition to being functional, native wildflowers add attractive color to the landscape.

The new parking designed by the Directorate of Public Works will increase parking spaces, capture water to recharge the aquifer and be more energy efficient.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
USAF Photo by Joel Martinez

IMCOM welcomes new commander

USAF Photo by Joel Martinez Army Lt. Gen. David Halverson, left, accepts the colors from Army Gen. John Campbell, center, Vice Chief of Staff of the Army, and assumes duties as commanding general of the U.S. Army Installation M...
 
 

Fort operations will not jeopardize endangered species

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Army have completed formal consultation regarding the potential effects that Fort Huachuca’s operations will have on threatened and endangered species. In a biological opinion, or BO, signed March 31, the Service concluded that the Army’s ongoing and planned operations are not likely to jeopardize the continued survival...
 
 
ebooks-books

Electronic books playing bigger role in SVPL

Librarians are asked all the time whether they think print books will go away, and they always answer with a resounding, ‘No!’ The media loves to portray extremes, but the reality of the situation is that outliers always ex...
 

 
Peer-Mediators-4_4.1

Student-to-student program helps FH school resolve conflicts

From left, fourth grade peer mediators Katherine Ricks, 9, and Cade Olson, Braiden Blood and Katelynn Harris, all 10, wear their Peer Mediation Program t-shirts during recess. This year there are 30 students involved in the pro...
 
 
Maranda Flynn

Keep young people off streets, consider youth center

Maranda Flynn Dustin Crawford, 13, and Ulysses Delamora, 12, build an island with Kinex® while chatting about their day in the building blocks area of the Youth Center on Fort Huachuca. Building structures is only one of the m...
 
 
DSC_0006

Breaking, banging — Fort Huachuca Special Reaction Team trains in housing

Fort Huachuca Special Reaction Team members practice the break-and-rake technique used to gain entry into a structure, during a rare training event conducted in housing that is scheduled to be demolished, on Mott Circle, March ...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin