Army

May 24, 2012

At FH, 35G imagery analysts learn to have “eyes on the world”

By Amy Sunseri
Staff Writer

The 35G imagery analyst students attend 24 weeks of class during which they undergo intensive training through studying and analyzing imagery products, and determining target coordinates for accurate location of imagery analysis findings. They also learn how to prepare imagery analysis reports, products and special intelligence reports and briefings.

The 35G military occupational specialty, imagery analyst, plays an integral part in providing not only the Army but the United States with critical information about enemy forces. 35G Soldiers do this through monitoring overhead and aerial imagery, geospatial data, full motion video and other electronic monitoring in order to collect and analyze information required to design defense plans, support combat operations, and disaster relief, according to George Stemler, 111th Military Intelligence Brigade chief learning officer.

To say the MOS is quite challenging would be an understatement. Yet that is why many Soldiers like Pfc. Sara Banker, Pvt. David Galbraith and Pfc. Christina North chose the 35G MOS.

North says what caught her interest about the MOS was not only the challenge but the uniqueness.

“It’s a small field; not many people get to do this job,” North stated.

The 35G course was relocated from Fort Holabird, Md. to Fort Huachuca in 1971, explained Stemler. This was a result of the Army’s decision to move Army intelligence training to this installation.

The course is 24 weeks long. During the training, Soldiers study and analyze imagery products, and determine target coordinates for accurate location of imagery analysis findings. They also learn how to prepare imagery analysis reports, products and special intelligence reports and briefings.

“They exploit imagery from all types of sensors from various platforms, to include full motion video, wide-area motion imagery, multi-spectral imagery, hyper-spectral imagery, and moving target indicators as well as electro-optical, infrared and synthetic aperture radar. The imagery analyst integrates the information from these sensors with geospatial data to create critically needed comprehensive geospatial intelligence for the war fighter,” added Randy Gale, 35G course manager.

As for the training, Soldiers give a lot of credit to their teachers — both civilian and military.

“I love it. It’s a little stressful but, overall at the end of the day, you feel pretty accomplished” stated Galbraith.

“I was really nervous because I knew it would be a challenge, but the support and structure we have is amazing,” Banker added.

Upon graduation, 35G Soldiers can be assigned anywhere depending on the Army’s needs. They can be assigned to a brigade combat team, division, corps, theater and strategic levels. Gale explained that within months of graduating from the 35G course, a majority of the Soldiers join their gaining units and deploy to various locations including Afghanistan and South Korea.

“It’s been an awesome experience; the people here [Fort Huachuca] are incredible,” North said.

North along with Banker and Galbraith are set to graduate from the course at the end of May. North is headed to Fort Bragg, S.C., Galbraith is set to be attached to the 500th MI Brigade in Hawaii and Banker will return to her National Guard unit in New York.

The 35G course on Fort Huachuca is currently incorporating the Army Learning Model, ALM 2015. The new model uses new learning technologies built for the new generation of students who have used technology throughout their entire lives. According to Gale, as technology changes, new concepts and process will continue to evolve and will be implemented into the 35G course.

“Imagery analyst has transformed from analyzing film received from airborne and satellite systems with optics to analyzing a vast number of digital image sensor types and platforms using high-end computers. The imagery analyst of today does not just create pretty pictures. They create actionable and timely intelligence, derived from various types of imagery and geospatial data, used on a daily basis by the Warfighter. We are eyes for the Warfighter both in the planning and execution of missions,” Gale stated.




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