DoD

May 24, 2012

Foreign language capabilities remain a priority

By Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone Marshall Jr.
American Forces Press Service

WASHINGTON — A senior U.S. defense official suggested before Congress Monday that a lack of foreign language capabilities in the federal government could potentially pose a national security risk.

“Let me begin by stating that Defense Secretary [Leon E.] Panetta has long believed that having a strong language ability is critical to national security,” Laura Junor, deputy assistant secretary of defense for readiness, said in testimony before a Senate Homeland Security and Government Affairs Subcommittee “We’re committed to fielding the most capable force that we can deploy.”

Junor said mission success is directly connected to the ability to communicate effectively with local populations and international partners. “Our current challenge lies in filling language-required positions with personnel that possess the requisite language skills,” she said. “We’ve been reducing this deficiency, but we need help. We need our nation’s schools to develop students with these skills from which we can recruit to meet our needs.

“Studies show that exposure to foreign language and early language learning greatly facilitates language acquisition,” Junor said. “Therefore, bringing in individuals with foreign language skills makes it easier to train people to higher levels of proficiency. We are working to overcome these challenges through collaborative, interagency strategies to achieve our vision for language, regional and cultural capabilities,” she added.

These strategies, Junor said, address the importance of identifying language needs, acquiring and sustaining language skills, enhancing language careers, building partners and increasing surge capacity. “The department is improving the identification of its language needs through standardized, capabilities-based processes,” she said. “These processes enable the combatant commanders to articulate their language needs and provide them to the military services who supply the staff to meet those needs.”

DoD is also actively engaged with other federal agencies such as the National Security Education Board and the Defense Language Steering Committee, Junor said. “By experience, we’ve learned the importance of building a surge capacity to yield language expertise quickly and at a reasonable cost,” Junor said. “The department’s National Language Service Corps provides a pool of qualified volunteers with high levels of proficiency, in both English and foreign languages who can serve, and then be activated, as temporary government employees when needed.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
TRADOC

‘Start Strong:’ Every Army career starts with TRADOC

FORT EUSTIS, Va. — Through U.S. Army Recruiting Command, U.S. Army Center for Initial Military Training and U.S. Army Cadet Command, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command serves as the foundation for the “Start Strong” ...
 
 

Honoring Gold Star Mothers

As part of our commitment to never forget those Soldiers who gave all, the Army joins the Nation on Sunday in remembering the strength and sacrifice of its Gold Star Mothers. Since 1936, Congress has set aside the last Sunday in September to recognize the mothers of Service members who have died while defending our...
 
 

Remember Gold Star Mothers, Families

The term Gold Star Family is a modern reference that comes from the Service Flag. These flags/banners were first flown by Families during World War I. The flag included a blue star for every immediate Family member serving in the armed forces of the United States, during any period of war or hostilities in which...
 

 

New NCOER expected to more accurately assess Soldiers’ performance

WASHINGTON — On Aug. 1, the secretary of the Army approved the new Non-Commissioned Officer Evaluation Report. Implementation will be in September 2015. “The new NCOER will come out in five phases: inform, educate, train, roll-out and after-action review. Human Resources Command is beginning to build the NCOER into the Evaluation System now,” said Command...
 
 
Flooding1_20140918_S.Vasey

Water, water everywhere

Photos by Scott Vasey The remnants of Hurricane Odile brought significant rainfall to Fort Huachuca last week as shown in photos of Huachuca Creek Sept. 18. The storm made landfall as the strongest storm on record to hit Mexico...
 
 
_DSC9936

ISEC gains new senior enlisted leader

Timothy Toms Command Sgt. Maj. Ulysses Rayford, (center) U.S. Army Information Systems Engineering Command, accepts the sword of responsibility from Col. Patrick Kerr, ISEC commander (left), and Master Sgt. Christopher Paluzzi,...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin