Health & Safety

July 12, 2012

Protect your home from wildfire

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Fort Huachuca Office of Fire Prevention

Those who have time to take last-minute outdoor fire prevention measures before an evacuation might return to a home with less fire damage. However, the best time to clear around homes is when no threat of wildfires exists.

In part two of a four-part series running over the next few weeks, the members of the Fort Huachuca Office of Fire Prevention share information on how to protect the home inside and out during a wild fire.

If there’s potential of evacuation and if there’s time, take these steps to protect your home.

Inside:

  • Close windows, vents, doors, venetian blinds or non-combustible window coverings and heavy drapes.
  • Shut off all gas or propane and turn off pilot lights.
  • Move flammable furniture into the center of the home away from windows and sliding-glass doors.
  • Turn on a light in each room to increase the visibility of the home in heavy smoke.

Outside:

  • Seal attic and ground vents with pre-cut plywood or commercial seals.
  • Remove gas grills from decks and patios, and place propane tanks in the garage.
  • Place combustible patio furniture inside.
  • Connect garden hoses to outside taps.
  • Place a non-combustible ladder on house for firefighter access to the roof.
  • Remove firewood or any other combustibles stored near the home, and remove all shrubs and debris within 15 feet.
  • If advised to evacuate, do so immediately and safely.
  • Wear protective clothing-sturdy shoes, cotton or woolen clothing, long pants, long sleeved shirt, gloves and a handkerchief to protect your face.
  • Take an evacuation kit.
  • Lock your home.
  • Tie a white towel, sheet or ribbon on the front door; this advises emergency responders that the home has been evacuated.
  • Tell someone when you left and where you are going.
  • Choose a route away from fire hazards and watch for changes in the speed and direction of fire and smoke.

For more information on wildfire preparedness and evacuation kits, contact the Fort Huachuca Office of Fire Prevention, 533.5054.




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