Army

August 16, 2012

Army CID wants more Soldiers as special agents

By Colby Hauser
CID Public Affairs

QUANTICO, Va. — The Army’s Criminal Investigation Command, commonly known as CID, is looking for qualified applicants to become highly-trained criminal investigators.

Special agents within Criminal Investigation Command, commonly known as CID, are responsible for investigating numerous types of felony-level crimes, conducting protective-service operations, and working with other federal, state and local law enforcement agencies to solve crimes and combat terrorism.

Those accepted into the program to become agents will receive training at the U.S. Army Military Police School. They will also receive advanced training in specialized investigative disciplines. Selected agents may also receive advanced training at the FBI National Academy, the Metropolitan Police Academy at Scotland Yard, the DOD Polygraph Institute and the Canadian Police College.

“Being a special agent is an opportunity to be a part of something significantly larger than oneself,” said Special Agent David Eller, a special sexual assault investigator with the Fort Carson, Colo., CID Office. “You are often placed in a position of great responsibility, whether it’s protecting a dignitary at a foreign summit, to working a murder case, you have to be on your ‘A’ game every day.”

Eller said the CID is looking for agents who will take ownership of investigations, but more importantly, the agency is looking for “unquestionable integrity.”

Prospective agents attend the CID Special Agent Course at the U.S. Army Military Police School, Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., For 15 weeks, candidates receive advanced training in various specialized investigative disciplines and upon graduation become federal law enforcement officers.

The training is fast-paced and thought-provoking, said CID Command Sgt. Maj. Thomas Seaman. It covers everything from crime-scene processing to interviews and interrogations. It is also accredited by the Federal Law Enforcement Training Accreditation Board.

Many within the federal law enforcement community, both military and civilian agencies, view the course as the best basic agent training program in the United States.

“Our program is the best there is,” said Special Agent Ronald Meyer, chief, Physical Evidence Branch at USAMPS. “At other institutions, their prospective special agents spend maybe two days learning how to process a crime scene; our students here at Fort Leonard Wood spend about two weeks.”

During a career at CID, agents have the opportunity to attend advanced training at some of the most prestigious law enforcement programs in the world. Included among those institutions are the FBI National Academy, the Metropolitan Police Academy at Scotland Yard, the Defense Academy of Credibility Assessment, and the Canadian Police College.

A unique aspect of these programs for CID special agents is that they are offered to those who need it most, the agent in the field. Some other law enforcement agencies and major police departments often reserve this type of training for just their senior investigators or chiefs of police.

Agents also have the opportunity to pursue a master’s degree in forensic science from George Washington University. Enlisted agents have tremendous opportunities to become warrant officers.

To qualify to become part of CID, applicants must be a U.S. citizen and must be at least 21-years-old. Applicants must be no more than an E-5 (non-promotable). Those E-5s who are promotable, or those who have achieved E-6 but have one year or less time-in-grade, may apply with waiver. All applicants must have at least two years, but not more than 10 years time-in-service, have an ST score of 107 or higher (110 or higher if tested prior to January 2, 2002), have at least 60 college credit hours (waiver of up to half of this prerequisite may be considered), have normal color vision and no record of mental or emotional disorders.

Applicants must be able to speak and write clearly and attain and maintain a top secret-single scope background investigation security clearance. They must also have no record of unsatisfactory credit and no felony or court-martial convictions. Lastly, applicants must be able to complete 36 months of service obligation upon completion of the CID Special Agent Course. The complete listing of qualifications can be found on the CID website.

To apply to become a CID Special Agent, prospective applicants should contact The Criminal Investigation Command, Fort Huachuca Office, Building 41416, second floor, 533.2628/5202 or go to www.cid.army.mil for additional information.




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