Health & Safety

August 16, 2012

Fire safety: FH Training Centers not different from college dorms

Fort Huachuca Fire Prevention

Training groups who come to Fort Huachuca to learn, live in the same type of atmosphere as at other college campuses across the country. The same kind of fire safety rules apply for students living on Fort Huachuca as those living on other campuses.

Each year college and university students, on- and off-campus, experience hundreds of fire-related emergencies nationwide. There are several specific causes for fires on college campuses, including cooking, intentionally set fires and open flame. Overall, most college-related fires are due to a general lack of knowledge about fire safety and prevention.

For most students, the last fire safety training they received was in grade school, but with new independence come new responsibilities. It is important that both off-campus and on-campus students understand fire risks and know the preventative measures that could save their lives.

Since January 2000 until now, 79 fatal fires have been documented that occurred on a college campus, in fraternity or sorority housing or in off-campus housing within three miles of the campus — claiming a total of 114 victims.

Sixty-six fires have occurred in off-campus housing.

Seven fires taking nine lives have occurred in on-campus building or residence halls.

Ten victims died in six fires in fraternity or sorority housing.

Fourteen of these fires claiming 22 victims were intentionally set.

There were 35 accidental fires including those caused by cooking, candles, smoking or electrical causes, claiming 47 lives.

The cause has not been determined in 30 of these fires.

Many students cook in dorms or other lodging. When preparing food, cook only where it is permitted, and keep the cooking area clean and uncluttered.

Don’t overload circuits with electrical appliance cords. Never leave cooking unattended. If a fire starts in a microwave, keep the door closed and unplug the unit.

Many students like to burn candles. Avoid using lighted candles. Instead, choose battery operated ones with flames that mimic lit candles. Those who use real candles should not leave them unattended. Keep them away from draperies and linens.

Smoking is another leading cause of fires. Those who smoke should do so outdoors. Once finished, assure cigarettes and ashes are out. Never toss hot cigarette butts or ashes in the trash can.

After a party, check for cigarette butts, especially under cushions. Chairs and sofas catch on fire quickly and burn fast.

Be alert — don’t smoke in bed. If feeling sleepy from any cause, put cigarettes out safely before retiring.

For additional college and university fire safety tips, call the Fort Huachuca Fire Prevention Office, 533.7009.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Monsoon start means break from hot weather — keep safety in mind this summer

In Arizona, as in other regions of the world including India and Thailand, we experience a monsoon, a season of high temperatures, high winds, and high moisture, resulting in potentially deadly weather. The term “monsoon” comes from the Arabic “mausim,” meaning “season” or “wind shift.” Even though rain doesn’t typically begin in the southern Arizona...
 
 

Melanoma – silent but deadly

Do you love having fun in the sun? If you do, it is essential you protect your skin from exposure to harmful sun rays known to cause skin cancer. Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States, and melanoma is the deadliest skin cancer. According to the National Cancer Institute, more...
 
 

Army dentists fight uphill battle against sugar

Consultant to the Surgeon General for Dental Public Health Sugar is being called “the new tobacco.” Its many forms have been linked to the increasing rates of diabetes, heart disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and other chronic diseases in the U.S. Army dentists have been fighting on the front lines against sugar for decades. Despite...
 

 

DUI Memorial Vehicle is reminder of dangers of drinking, driving

An SUV with a crumpled front end and dented doors has been transformed into a symbol of the ultimate cost of driving under the influence — the death of a friend or loved one. The black SUV is emblazoned with 262 white crosses, one for each person killed in 2013 in a DUI-related accident in...
 
 

ACS shares disaster preparedness information, ERP news, class dates

Ready Army, special needs Families Army Community Service, ACS, Exceptional Family Program, EFMP, shares information from the Ready Army website. Ready Army is the Army’s proactive campaign to increase the resilience of the Army community and enhance the readiness of the force by informing Soldiers, their Families, Army Civilians and contractors of relevant hazards and...
 
 
Courtesy of City of Sierra Vista

Reading to babies is vital to brain development

Courtesy of City of Sierra Vista Studies show that parents who read to children from newborn to 3 when a baby’s brain goes through major changes especially related to vocabulary and communication skills, help play a major par...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin