Health & Safety

September 20, 2012

Got gas? Safety tips can prevent leaks

Fort Huachuca Fire Department

In late August, Fort Huachuca Fire Department personnel were dispatched to a building where a child was ill. What made the youth sick was a natural gas leak from a stove in a facility on Fort Huachuca. This leak was ongoing for some time and had been previously reported but not to the proper personnel to locate and correct the problem. It has now been taken care of, and a new stove will replace the defective equipment.

Natural gas gives off an odor that smells like rotten eggs. It also may give off a blowing or hissing sound. Anyone who smells it or thinks there is a leak should leave the area immediately and inform their gas company right away. Thos who don’t know the number should call emergency service, 911. Do not try to locate the source of the gas leak or try to shut off gas valves or appliances.

Do not use any electrical devices, such as light switches, telephones or garage door openers. They could spark and ignite the gas.

Avoid using open flame, matches or lighters or starting vehicles.

Do not re-enter the building or return to the area until your gas company says it is safe.

If the natural gas ignites, let it burn. Do not put out the flame; burning gas will not explode.

Other signs of a natural gas leak include dead or discolored vegetation in an otherwise green area; flames, if a leak has ignited; dirt or dust blowing from a hole in the ground or bubbling in wet or flooded areas.

Prevent natural gas leaks when installing a natural gas appliance by hiring a professional to do it. Incorrect installation can lead to a slow and undetectable natural gas leak. Read and follow the manufacturer’s instructions for the care and use of natural gas appliances. Check the flame on pilot lights and burners. If they have a steady blue flame, they are operating correctly. Never use a gas stove to heat a home or other building or for anything besides cooking.

Have all gas appliances, furnaces, vents, flues, chimneys and gas lines in a home or business inspected every year or two by qualified industry professionals. This is usually a free service.

Keep areas around all gas appliances and equipment clean and unblocked to allow for proper air flow. Natural gas can build up in the air if it is not able to circulate out through vents.

Store chemicals and flammable materials away from gas appliances.

Always make sure there is at least one multipurpose fire extinguisher in your home or place of business.

Keep children away from natural gas appliances, and teach them natural gas safety.

Following these simple steps can help residents and business owners avoid a potential tragedy.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Natalie Lakosil

Black History Month marks 100 years of progress

Natalie Lakosil More than 100 people took part in the 100th celebration of observing African American/Black History Month Feb. 26. The mood was light and joyous as more than 100 people of all backgrounds gathered at the Thunder...
 
 

TBI can occur in battle, garrison — awareness important

Traumatic brain injury, TBI, has been called the “signature wound” of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Injuries the Service members receive downrange can originate from improvised explosive devices, IEDs, rocket-propelled grenades, mortars, gun blasts, accidents and equipment failure. Many military personnel have experienced multiple deployments due to the length of war, translating into m...
 
 

Army Emergency Relief annual campaign underway

Financial security is a key element of a ready and resilient force. The Army Emergency Relief, AER, Annual Campaign is conducted from March 1 through May 15 in order to increase Soldier awareness of this benefit, as well as to give Soldiers the opportunity to help their fellow Soldiers by donating. Local commanders can adjust...
 

 

Civilian of the Month

Anthony Black Agency: Communications Security Logistics Activity Position and duties: Program manager for an application that manages communication security equipment How long at current assignment: 11 years How long in government service: Almost 34 years Residence: Sierra Vista Hobbies: Working around the house, hanging out with grandchildren and being an active member in church at...
 
 
U.S. Army graphic

Traumatic Brain Injury awareness month highlights resources

U.S. Army graphic The Center for Disease Control and Prevention reports that approximately 2.5 million emergency room visits, hospitalizations or deaths were associated with a singular traumatic brain injury, or TBI, a combinat...
 
 

BAH can take you far when living on post

Many Service members across the country should now be aware that the Basic Allowance for Housing, or BAH, rates for 2015 have changed, and for Soldiers assigned to Fort Huachuca, it has decreased drastically. BAH is determined by an array of market analysis reports collected from the surrounding area by a government-hired firm. The changes...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin