Army

September 20, 2012

Property accountability is every Soldier’s responsibility

Sgt. 1st Class Dexter Robinson
USAICoE and FH Assistant Inspector General

Many Soldiers and leaders believe they have no responsibility or culpability for Army property unless they have accepted it on a hand receipt, but property accountability is the core of military equipment stewardship. The Army standard for maintaining and tracking supplies is for Soldiers to treat the property as if it was their own. The Army Command Supply Discipline Program, implemented by Army Regulation 710-2, “Supply Policy Below the National Level,” is the embodiment of that standard. The CSDP provides Soldiers and leaders alike a common set of rules for safeguarding scarce resources.

Every Soldier has some level of responsibility for property in his unit. There are five types of responsibility when it comes to accountability. They are command, supervisory, direct, custodial and personal responsibility. The commander has “command” responsibility as soon as he takes command. A platoon leader or section chief has “supervisory” responsibility once he assumes his position. Squad leaders, team chiefs and staff officers and noncommissioned officers in charge incur the same supervisory responsibility. Soldiers have “direct” responsibility if they have physical control of property or if they have signed for it on a hand receipt. Soldiers who sign a hand receipt are accountable for all components of items listed on the hand receipt unless they receive a valid shortage annex which lists components that are not available for issue. Without a valid shortage annex, an item is assumed to be complete. “Custodial” responsibility results from assignment as a supply sergeant, supply custodian, supply clerk or warehouse person, or is rated by and answerable directly to the accountable officer or individual having direct responsibility for the property. The final type of responsibility, “personal responsibility,” is inherent in all members of the armed forces.

These five types of responsibilities are linked to one common goal — the proper care, use, and safeguarding of Army property. These responsibilities are a cornerstone of sound leadership; they cannot be delegated, withdrawn or ignored. These responsibilities are assumed with or without a hand receipt. The CSDP allows commanders to set a climate in which supply policies are enforced. It establishes an environment in which Soldiers and leaders can manage property proactively and requisition supplies and equipment. Soldiers and leaders who are responsible for equipment must know their equipment, its whereabouts and its status. When one person deviates from the standard of maintaining, caring for and safeguarding Army property, the CSDP is compromised.

The Army has a proven, time-tested process for managing property. By following the CSDP and providing proper command emphasis to its enforcement, Army units will have the resources needed to fight and win wars.

For more information, call the Inspector General Office, 533.3448.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

FH renewable energy project to provide approximately 25 percent of installation’s annual electricity requirement

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The U.S. Army announced Monday plans to start development of a solar array that will provide about 25 percent of the annual installation electricity requirement of Fort Huachuca. “This will be the largest solar array in the Department of Defense on a military installation,” according to the Honorable Katherine Hammack, assistant secretary...
 
 

Whistleblower reprisal — what it is, isn’t

Many people who observe or learn of wrongdoing are often afraid to report it because they fear that if the word got out, negative action would be taken against them. In order for the office of the Inspector General, or IG, to provide assistance, it is important that the Fort Huachuca community fully understand what...
 
 
U.S. Army

Military Intelligence – Moment in MI history

Field Station Augsburg established in 1970 U.S. Army The enormous AN/FLR-9 “Elephant Cage” antenna array was erected at Field Station Augsburg in Germany. April 14, 1970 In 1970, the nation’s attention was focused on Viet...
 

 
Maranda Flynn

EPG celebrates 60 years, new small arc structure dedicated

Maranda Flynn From left, Rob Reiner, former Electronic Proving Ground technical director, Eddie Flores, EPG’s youngest employee, and Maj. Gen. Peter Utley, commanding general, U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command, cut the ca...
 
 
Gordon Van Vleet

NETCOM gains new commander during ceremony here Wednesday

Gordon Van Vleet Brig. Gen. Peter A. Gallagher, outgoing NETCOM Commanding General, passes the NETCOM flag to Lt. Gen. Edward C. Cardon, Army Cyber Command/2d U.S. Army Commanding General, while incoming NETCOM commanding gener...
 
 

Army tightens personal appearance, tattoo policy

WASHINGTON — The number, size and placement of tattoos have been dialed back under revised Army Regulation 670-1, which governs the Army’s grooming standards and proper wear of the uniform. The revised regulation was published Monday, along with Department of the Army Pamplet 670-1, outlining the new standards. Effective dates for the various changes can...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin