Army

September 20, 2012

Property accountability is every Soldier’s responsibility

Sgt. 1st Class Dexter Robinson
USAICoE and FH Assistant Inspector General

Many Soldiers and leaders believe they have no responsibility or culpability for Army property unless they have accepted it on a hand receipt, but property accountability is the core of military equipment stewardship. The Army standard for maintaining and tracking supplies is for Soldiers to treat the property as if it was their own. The Army Command Supply Discipline Program, implemented by Army Regulation 710-2, “Supply Policy Below the National Level,” is the embodiment of that standard. The CSDP provides Soldiers and leaders alike a common set of rules for safeguarding scarce resources.

Every Soldier has some level of responsibility for property in his unit. There are five types of responsibility when it comes to accountability. They are command, supervisory, direct, custodial and personal responsibility. The commander has “command” responsibility as soon as he takes command. A platoon leader or section chief has “supervisory” responsibility once he assumes his position. Squad leaders, team chiefs and staff officers and noncommissioned officers in charge incur the same supervisory responsibility. Soldiers have “direct” responsibility if they have physical control of property or if they have signed for it on a hand receipt. Soldiers who sign a hand receipt are accountable for all components of items listed on the hand receipt unless they receive a valid shortage annex which lists components that are not available for issue. Without a valid shortage annex, an item is assumed to be complete. “Custodial” responsibility results from assignment as a supply sergeant, supply custodian, supply clerk or warehouse person, or is rated by and answerable directly to the accountable officer or individual having direct responsibility for the property. The final type of responsibility, “personal responsibility,” is inherent in all members of the armed forces.

These five types of responsibilities are linked to one common goal — the proper care, use, and safeguarding of Army property. These responsibilities are a cornerstone of sound leadership; they cannot be delegated, withdrawn or ignored. These responsibilities are assumed with or without a hand receipt. The CSDP allows commanders to set a climate in which supply policies are enforced. It establishes an environment in which Soldiers and leaders can manage property proactively and requisition supplies and equipment. Soldiers and leaders who are responsible for equipment must know their equipment, its whereabouts and its status. When one person deviates from the standard of maintaining, caring for and safeguarding Army property, the CSDP is compromised.

The Army has a proven, time-tested process for managing property. By following the CSDP and providing proper command emphasis to its enforcement, Army units will have the resources needed to fight and win wars.

For more information, call the Inspector General Office, 533.3448.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Julianne E. Cochran

Help wanted: Enlisted aides in valued roles for Army leaders

Julianne E. Cochran An Enlisted Aide Training Course instructor shows a student the specifics of setting up a general officer’s uniform during a practical exercise. WASHINGTON – Enlisted aides are considered an elite group ...
 
 

CWFC supports Fort’s civilian employees

Fort Huachuca’s Civilian Welfare Fund Council (CWFC) uses the money derived from vending machines to support federal employees. Each month a percentage of the money from post snack and soda vending machines goes into a secured CWFC account to provide morale and recreational activities to civilian employees. According to Carmen Chastain, CWFC president, these activities...
 
 
Photo courtesy of Richard Grosinsky

Hunter unmanned aircraft system ends history here, leaves long legacy

Photo courtesy of Richard Grosinsky From that first Hunter unmanned aircraft system training class that graduated here April 27, 1992, to its final flight here July 10, Fort Huachuca’s UAS program continues to build on the vi...
 

 

Official participation in #GiveThem20 campaign not authorized

The Office of the Judge Advocate General has been notified by the DOD Standards of Conduct Office about an online social media campaign titled”#GiveThem20.” The action is supported by, and draws attention to, a national nonprofit organization called American Corporate Partners. The campaign is online at GiveThem20.org. The campaign proposes video recording yourself or a...
 
 

OPM announces steps to protect federal workers, others from cyber threats

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) announced July 15 the results of the interagency forensics investigation into a recent cyber incident involving federal background investigation data and the steps it is taking to protect those impacted. Throughout this investigation, OPM has been committed to providing information in a timely, transparent and accurate...
 
 
U.S. Army photo

Military Intelligence – Moment in MI history

Maj. Gen. Ralph Van Deman – Namesake of the East Gate U.S. Army photo Maj. Gen. Paul Menoher, commander of the US Army Intelligence Center, and Command Sgt. Maj. Art Johnson unveil the memorialization plaque at the Van Deman ...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>