U.S.

October 11, 2012

JITC senior enlisted leaders change responsibility, one retires

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Ray Ragan
Public Affairs Officer, JITC

From left, Sgt. Maj. Cary Marshall, the out-going senior enlisted leader for the Joint Interoperability Test Command stands with Command Sgt. Maj. Donald Manley, the senior enlisted advisor for the Defense Information Systems Agency and Sgt. Maj. Lewis Brown, the in-coming senior enlisted leader for JITC after the change of responsibility ceremony here on Oct. 4. After the ceremony, Marshall retired, serving 32 years in the U.S. Army and nearly four years of service to JITC, an organization charged with testing, evaluating and certifying communication and information systems and products for joint use.

With a snap of the noncommissioned officer’s sword back into its scabbard, the senior enlisted leader of the Joint Interoperability Test Command symbolically cut his ties to JITC and passed responsibility to a new senior enlisted leader during a change of responsibility ceremony here on Oct. 4.

After the change of responsibility, Sgt. Maj. Cary Marshall retired, serving 32 years in the U.S. Army and nearly four years of service to JITC, an organization charged with testing, evaluating and certifying communication and information systems and products for joint use. Accepting responsibility for JITC as the senior enlisted leader is Sgt. Maj. Lewis Brown. Presiding over the ceremony was JITC’s Commander, U.S. Army Col. Douglas Orsi.

The change of responsibility ceremony uses the noncommissioned officer’s sword to symbolize the charge of responsibility for a unit as the senior enlisted leader. Here, Marshall ceremoniously passed the sword to Command Sgt. Maj. Donald Manley, the senior enlisted advisor for the Defense Information Systems Agency. Then Manley passed the sword to Brown, who accepted his charge to provide advice to guide JITC and for the well-being of the service members, civilians and their families of JITC.

“JITC family, you are getting an exceptional leader and family to your organization,” Manley said. “He [Brown] brings a wealth of knowledge through the spectrum of not only the Army, but the culture of taking care of people and their families.”

“So I can tell you, you are getting an amazing leader, as well as losing an amazing leader,” he added.

Attending the ceremony were well over 100 people, comprised of family members, service members, civilians and contractors from the Fort Huachuca-headquartered JITC, the nearby community of Sierra Vista, U.S. Army Intelligence Center and the U.S. Army Network Enterprise Technology Command, where both sergeants major previously served.

Addressing the audience, Brown said, “I am truly honored to be a member of the DISA and JITC family, as we understand our role in support of DISA’s strategic plan as a joint enabler, I look forward to working with you and for you as a servant leader to meet those goals.”

After the narrator read Marshall’s retirement orders to the audience, Marshall addressed the audience last. Marshall gripped the podium as he surveyed the audience to find his wife, Susana, his children and his two brothers, before he began with his farewell.

“Who would have thought a country boy from Selma, Alabama would be standing here today after 32 years of service. Not me,” said Marshall. “I have done a lot of things in the Army, and the Army life has been good to me and my family.”

Marshall thanked his family for their sacrifice and support, the people who mentored him through his career and the workforce of JITC for their professionalism and warmth.

“JITC, the future is bright and it is yours, I challenge you to grab it and run with it and do the great things I know you are capable of doing.” Marshall concluded, “Sergeant Major Brown, the workforce is yours-give them wise counsel and guidance, and in return, they will take care of you.”

Prior to the ceremony, members of the B Troop, 4th Regiment, U.S. Calvary (Memorial) Ladies Auxiliary, Anastasia Virden and Claira Venditto presented bouquets of red roses to Marshall’s wife and yellow rose buds to Brown’s wife, Shanda, respectively.

The yellow roses represented the color of a new beginning, while the red roses represented the beauty and fulfillment of commitment, as part of the JITC family.

Orsi addressed the audience and the Marshall family, “at the end of the day when we retire, the only one there is your family, hopefully to your left and right.”

“Obviously your family is here today to your left and right — that’s power and that’s goodness,” added Orsi.




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