Commentary

October 18, 2012

Redress — what it means, what IG staff can do

It is important to know the meaning of the word “redress” since it could possibly apply to you. “Redress” means to remedy or set right. Inspectors General are very limited in what they can do when it comes to providing assistance if an issue or complaint has an established form of redress.

Many times, Soldiers come to the IG office with a complaint, and the IG staff has to inform them they are not able to assist them until they have gone through the redress process. The IG staff takes the time to explain the process and whom they need to contact in order for the individuals to remedy their situation. Inspectors General can provide assistance by providing regulatory guidance on how to appeal an issue, but IGs cannot appeal on an individual’s behalf.

Examples of issues that have a form of redress include: courts-martial actions; non-judicial punishment; officer evaluation reports; noncommissioned officer evaluation reports; enlisted reductions; type of discharge received; pending or requested discharge; financial liability investigations of property loss; relief-for-cause; adverse information filed in personnel records (except for allegations of reprisal); and claims.

It is hard to appeal an issue without supporting documents. Research what is required to appeal the issue and provide everything the appeal process requires. It is important to have all needed documents when preparing for an appeal. Most appeal processes include rigid deadlines and call for information documented on specific forms. Therefore, careful research can aid people in ensuring their appeals can be processed quickly and efficiently.

Those who feel their issues have gone through the redress process and still require Inspector General assistance, are welcome to contact the IG office. Inspectors General can review the redress process to ensure people were afforded due process in accordance with law or regulation. Keep in mind the IG cannot overturn any decision that was made. The staff can only ensure people were afforded due process.

Every situation is unique. Those who are not sure if the redress applies in their situation can contact the IG office, 533.1144.




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