Army

November 1, 2012

Two new educational opportunities for Soldiers, civilian employees

Scout Reports

The United States Army Intelligence Center of Excellence announces two cooperative efforts with local higher education institutions to offer Soldiers and civilians educational opportunities that benefit both the participants and USAICoE. Qualified Department of the Army civilians, or DACs, can earn a master’s certificate in Instructional Design from the University of Arizona, and any instructor can earn an associate of Applied Science in Education, or AAS-ED, degree through Cochise Community College.

The AAS-ED program is open to Soldiers, DACs and contractors instructing at USAICoE. Students take the 20 core credits for this program through Staff and Faculty Development Division, or SFDD, courses. The remaining 27 hours of electives can come from any other college course work already completed by the student. This includes any military occupational specialty credentialing completed after 1981.

SFDD instructors explain the program and offer registration materials and help for the Cochise College credit to the student on the first day of class. Representatives from Cochise College, come to SFDD on Thursdays during lunch to collect the registration forms and fees for that week’s students. The only prerequisite for this program is successful completion of the Army Basic Instructor Course.

The core courses for this program are:
EDU 203: Foundations of Instructional Techniques; EDU 204: Learner Centered Instruction (USAICoEs Advanced Instructional Methods course); EDU 205: Theoretical Dynamics of Instruction (USAICoEs Small Group Instructor course); EDU 206: Coaching Practicum; EDU 207: Instructional Design for Adult Education (USAICoEs Systems Approach to Training course); and EDU 208: Capstone Practicum for Instructional Techniques (USAICoE’s Course Improvement Project).

Most are three-credit courses. The two four-credit courses require work completed after an initial face-to-face class. The Coaching Practicum requires students to complete the Coaches Workshop, document 65 hours of coaching, complete two reflections and meet with the instructor to discuss the reflections. The Capstone Practicum requires students to complete the Action Research Workshop, receive approval for the CIP planning worksheet and successful completion of the project brief.

“This is an awesome program for instructors who are interested in pursuing a degree in education or getting a first degree under their belt. How cool is it to get college credit for courses you have to take anyway?” explained Beth Leeder, chief, SFDD, USAICoE.

For DAC instructors who already have a bachelor’s degree, the master’s certificate in Instructional Design will provide the skills needed to participate in reshaping their courses towards Army Learning Model methodologies. For students accepted into this program, USAICoE pays program tuition and fees, with book cost and technology resources needed for this distance-learning program the responsibility of the student. It is open to qualified DACs who meet the following program requirements:

Applicants must have completed their federal government probationary status and have no disciplinary actions within the past two years.

Those applying must provide official transcripts which document a bachelor’s degree.

Potential students must have earned a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 for the last 60 credits of undergraduate work.
“It is important to keep in mind that any qualified student can contact the University of Arizona and enroll in the Master’s Certificate Program, however USAICoE funding is available only to DACs,” Leeder explained.

Enrollment for the first cohort is complete. Applications will be accepted in the second quarter of fiscal 13 for the Fall 13 semester cohort, with the selection board scheduled not later than May 1.

To learn about the application and registration process or for more information about either program, contact Leeder, 538.1128 or beth.a.leeder.civ@mail.mil.




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