U.S.

November 15, 2012

Use open door policy to resolve problems at lowest levels

Sgt. 1st Class Manuel De Leon Vega
USAICoE and Fort Huachuca Assistant Inspector General

When a Soldier comes into the Inspector General’s Office, one of the first questions the IG staff asks the person is, “Have you spoken to your chain of command about this issue?” More often than not, they find that Soldiers did not communicate with their leaders.

The majority of issues brought to the IG Office are fixable at the unit level. Many times when an IG contacts the commander to address a situation, it is the first time the commander has heard of the issue. If he or she knew the problem existed, the leader may have been able to find a solution within their means prior to the issue coming to the IG office.

In accordance with Army Regulation 600-20, “Army Command Policy,” dated March 18, with a Rapid Action Revision date of Sept. 20, “Commanders will establish an open door policy within their commands,” and “An open door policy allows members of the command to present facts, concerns and problems of a personal or professional nature or other issues that the Soldier has been unable to resolve.” The open door policy should be a Soldier’s first avenue of approach when he or she has an issue.

There are two steps which need to be taken for successful use of the open door policy. First, the commander is responsible for ensuring Soldiers are aware of the command’s open door policy. Second, the Soldiers are responsible to ensure the commander is made aware of problems that affect discipline, morale and mission effectiveness.

The IG staff has found that, even though commanders have an open-door policy in place and are willing to listen to a Soldier’s concern on a one-on-one basis, a few first-line supervisors or noncommissioned officers feel undermined if they are not informed of the Soldier’s issue. Some go to the extent of not authorizing the Soldier to use the open-door policy. Even though the IG Office staff recommends Soldiers seek help or counsel by talking to their first-line supervisor first and use the NCO channels to try to resolve issues at the lowest echelon, first-line supervisors and NCOs need to understand that going straight to the top is an option Soldiers have under the open door policy. Impeding Soldiers of the use of such policy is a violation of a regulation.

Everyone must be involved in this area. Soldiers, communicate your concerns to your chain of command, starting at the lowest level, and if necessary, take the issue up the chain in the order of company commander, battalion commander and brigade commander, as appropriate.

Soldiers with questions or concerns should call 533.1144. The IG staff is here to help.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
square

A local take on America’s PrepareAthon!

Over the month of April events have been taking place nationwide to help ensure America’s preparedness in the event of an emergency. America’s PrepareAthon is a grassroots movement that highlights the importance of prepared...
 
 
Stephanie Caffall

Second ‘Take Back Night’ hosted at Cochise College

Stephanie Caffall Rick Mueller, mayor, City of Sierra Vista, spoke at the Take Back the Night event and encouraged the community to put an end to sexual assault and harassment. Fort Huachuca and the Sierra Vista community joine...
 
 

BLUE BORDER MESSAGE / SEXUAL ASSAULT CASE COMPLETED

At a court martial on 25 March 2015, a Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army, was tried for committing sexual acts on multiple occasions by causing bodily harm. The 2LT pled not guilty, but was found guilty to the charge of sexual assault. On 27 March 2015, the 2LT was sentenced to a dismissal. The sexual assault...
 

 
Stephanie Caffall

Installation Retirement Ceremony honors retirees

Stephanie Caffall Fourteen Soldiers, one Department of Army Civilian and their guests await the formal recognition portion of the Installation Retirement Ceremony Friday on Brown Parade Field. Fort Huachuca honored 14 Soldiers ...
 
 
Natalie Lakosil

Holocaust Remembrance Day Observance reminds crowd of valuable lessons

Natalie Lakosil Lily Brull, Holocaust survivor, receives a poem, flowers and homemade Challah bread from Malachi, 4, and Kayalynn Fiddes, 8, after speaking about her experience as a Holocaust survivor. Lily Brull was only 10 ye...
 
 
U.S. Army photo

Military Intelligence – Moment in MI history

U.S., Britain agree to share communications intelligence U.S. Army photo Maj. Melvin C. Helfers evaluated ULTRA, or Special Intelligence, and presented it to Gen. George Patton. The BRUSA Agreement severely restricted access to...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin