Events

November 21, 2012

Military Intelligence — this week in history: November 21, 2012


Lieutenant takes world’s first night aerial photograph
Nov. 20, 1925
George Goddard pioneered many of the advances in aerial reconnaissance experimenting with infrared photography; long-focal length camera lenses; and “quick work photography” which allowed photographers to develop their photos within minutes and put them in the hands of the ground commanders.

A long-time dream of Goddard’s was to perfect aerial photography at night, which would prevent the enemy from hiding their activities under a cloak of darkness. He had experimented, successfully, with powder bombs, devices that would be dropped from a plane, explode, and trigger a plane-mounted camera’s shutter at the same moment the charges lit up the night sky. Not only extremely dangerous, it was difficult to synchronize the brightest part of the blast with the camera’s shutter.

The first real breakthrough came when he witnessed a demonstration by telephone engineers operating their picture-transmitting equipment with a photo-electric cell inside a revolving drum. Goddard realized that the energy produced by the cell could be amplified to actuate the shutter of a camera. Then, when the light from the powder flash mounted on the tail of his airplane could trigger a camera shutter, synchronization would be achieved.

Goddard’s dream finally became a reality on Nov. 20, 1925, when he set up a test over Rochester, N.Y.

His crew consisted of the pilot, two lieutenants from the Army Ordnance Corps, his research partner, “Doc” Burke, and himself. Armed with a super-size powder bomb, 14 feet long and eight inches in diameter, packed with 80 pounds of explosive, the crew took off. They dropped the bomb around 11 o’clock at night over the city.

Twenty seconds later it exploded with a tremendous blast and brilliant light which was so fast it took the place of a shutter in the camera. The results took awhile to process, since they had to land the plane in darkness, get to their hotel — difficult because of the mass panic the explosion had caused.

Later that day, the newspapers proudly displayed the world’s first photograph ever taken at night from an airplane. When they got back to Dayton, there was a letter from Goddard’s commanding officer saying, “from now on, [expletive] let the people know before you scare the hell out of them. And congratulations for a terrific job.”

“This Week in History” is a feature on the Command History Office website.
Those with Army Knowledge Online access can go to their site, https://ikn.army.mil/apps/mi_history/.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Photos by Staff Sgt. Steve Cortez

CSA makes first visit here, highlights unique capabilities

Photos by Staff Sgt. Steve Cortez U.S. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno speaks with 111th Military Intelligence Brigade leadership during his visit to Fort Huachuca, AZ, Dec. 9, 2014. Fort Huachuca leadership hosted Chief o...
 
 

Avoid becoming a DUI statistic over coming holidays

As Soldiers prepare for holiday block leave and Families plan their festive holiday gatherings, Army Substance Abuse Program personnel remind Soldiers, Civilians and the community that drunk or drugged driving can be a lethal combination with disastrous consequences, even death. In Arizona, if a person driving is impaired to the slightest degree, he or she...
 
 
City of Sierra Vista

Sierra Vista receives “Purple Heart City” designation

City of Sierra Vista Sierra Vista Mayor Rick Mueller, city officials, senior leaders from Fort Huachuca and members of the Military Order of the Purple Heart stand before the sign designating Sierra Vista a Purple Heart City. T...
 

 

Parking lots can be modern-day mazes

With the holidays fast approaching, parking lots tend to get more crowded as people jostle for spaces so they can mail cards and packages and do last-minute shopping for gifts, parties and holiday dinners. Many people find parking lots are among the most confusing places to drive, according to Anastasia Dean safety and occupational health...
 
 

Civilian of the Month

Debbie Short Civilian of the Month: Debbie Short Agency: Network Enterprise Technology Command Position and duties: Civilian workforce development specialist responsible for training, education and budgeting of the civilian development program How long at current assignment: 4 years, 7 months How long in government service: 30 years today Residence: Tucson Family: Son Joshua Short, 26...
 
 

ACS offers scholarships, resiliency training

AER provides scholarships Army Emergency Relief maintains two scholarship programs — the Spouse Education Assistance Program and the Maj. Gen. James Ursano Scholarship Program for dependent children. Both scholarships provide financial assistance for students who are pursuing their first undergraduate degree. Scholarship applications will be accepted from Jan. 2 to May 1 each year for...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin