Local

November 21, 2012

Native American culture, history — observed, honored

Maj. Gen. Gregg Potter, commanding general, U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence and Fort Huachuca, presented Spencer Kerr and Mariela Picorelly, students from Colonel Smith Middle School, Fort Huachuca, with a certificate of appreciation, in honor of their winning entries to the Native American Heritage poetry contest.

Fort Huachuca celebrated Native American Heritage Month at the Thunder Mountain Activity Centre on Nov. 14 with poetry readings, a cultural dance demonstration and a Native American Code Talker presentation.

The event started out with a traditional Native American invocation by Joe Joaquin, cultural resource specialist, Tohono O’Odham Nation. The first deliverance was spoken in the native O’Odham language and then repeated in English. Following the prayer, Eliath Chavez, Buena Vista High School Chorus, sang the national anthem.

Maj. Gen. Gregg Potter, commanding general, U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence and Fort Huachuca, addressed the distinguished guests, giving recognition and thanks to those providing knowledge, entertainment and support of the Native American heritage. “I think that these Native American Heritage celebrations are very, very important because we learn about other cultures. The Army has not always done so well with understanding other cultures, and so the fact that we are here talking about Native American Heritage Month is very important because that is a culture that we didn’t understand. Quite frankly, we didn’t treat the first inhabitants of our country very well and there are others in our history that we have done the same to. I think the more that we can learn from each other, the better off we can be,” he said.

Mariela Picorelly and Spencer Kerr, students at Colonel Smith Middle School, then recited their poems that won the Native American Heritage poetry contest.

The Pascola group of the Pascua Yaqui Tribe performed a cultural demonstration, the deer dance. The Pascola Deer Dance is part of the traditional Lenten ceremonies, usually lasting through the night, signifying the relationship between the Pascua Yaqui Tribe and the deer, an animal that they are both scared of and admire.

There was a dancer wearing a white cloth around his head and eyes, and a deer head with antlers attached on top. He wore rattles made of gourds around his wrists and had cocoon rattles tied around his ankles. He danced with a Pascola member, who portrayed an attempted capture of the deer.

There were two singers who sat on the floor playing a rasping stick, representing the deer’s breathing and another singer who used a water drum, representing the deer’s heartbeat. A violin and a harp were used to accompany a flute and drum that created the symbolic wilderness-like music. The Pascola group then presented a tribute dance, giving thanks to the veterans and their Families.

Dr. William Meadows, author of “The Comanche Code Talkers of World War II,” speaks about the group of men that created a code from their native language and used it to transmit secret communications on the battlefield during World Wars I and II.

Following the demonstration, guest speaker, Dr. William Meadows, professor, Missouri State University, gave a brief about the Native American Code Talkers of both world wars. Dr. Meadows is the author of the book “Comanche Code Talkers of WWII” and has published numerous articles. His various testimonies and research influenced the 2008 Code Talkers Recognition Act that gave federal recognition to all Native American Code Talkers. A slide show was presented, giving detailed information about the code talkers, who they were, how they began, what their role was, and where they are today.

Concluding the presentation, Potter presented awards to those who participated in the Native American Heritage Month Observance, presenting them with certificates of achievement and tokens of appreciation.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

FH schools to celebrate National Bike to School Day March 06

Students from Colonel Johnston, General Myer and Colonel Smith Middle Schools will be riding or walking to school on March 6 along with parents, teachers and community leaders. The event will begin from 7 to 8:30 a.m. with youth, parents and community leaders riding or walking from parking lot locations listed below or from home....
 
 

Chalk Talk

Colonel Johnston Elementary School History will come to life in Amy Sullins’ second grade classroom on Tuesday. Students have been researching a famous person from the American Revolution or Westward Expansion. They are writing a short biography and memorizing a speech in the first person. They will come to school dressed as their person and...
 
 
Courtesy photo

Diving platform at Barnes Field House helps with Soldier training

Courtesy photo A Soldier in full uniform jumps down from a platform mounted 6 feet above the pool at Barnes Filed House. The platform was installed to give a semblance of realism to water safety training offered here and make a...
 

 
photo

Chalk Talk

Colonel Johnston Elementary School History will come to life in Amy Sullins’ second grade classroom on March 3. Students are researching a famous person from the American Revolution or Westward Expansion. They are writing a s...
 
 

Prescribed burning to take place on Fort Huachuca

Sierra Vista — Coronado National Forest, Sierra Vista Ranger District, in collaboration with Fort Huachuca will begin spring-season prescribed fires on Fort Huachuca Monday – Wednesday. Prescribed fire activities are expected to continue throughout the year when favorable weather permits. Current plans include three prescribed fire areas totaling approximately 4,700 acres. The areas to be...
 
 

Outreach Ministries Program coordinator retires after 47 years

The longtime Chapel Outreach Ministries Program director is retiring from the federal government after 47 years of civil service. Jo Moore, a Fort Huachuca Main Post Chapel icon, has spent the past 31 years of her civil service working for the chapel on the installation. During her tenure, she and the programs she started have...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin