Army

December 13, 2012

Common courtesy invests in future of Army

Tags:
Master Sgt. Donald Pint
USAICoE and Fort Huachuca Inspector General NCOIC


Consideration of others must be a common practice for every Soldier. Common courtesy is an issue that needs to be addressed in today’s Army. Sensitivity and kindness go a long way to building strong relationships. For a leader, that means building relationships with Soldiers, others in your organization, other units and fellow leaders. A leader who is all business and treats people in an impersonal, calculated way won’t inspire much cooperation or commitment from others.

For starters, pay attention to what people are going through and be ready to assist them with consideration and encouragement. It doesn’t take much to offer a kind word or a thoughtful gesture when others need one. Also, make it a habit to reflect on how words and actions impact others. Let your heart go out to them, and do what you can to help. Relationships with the members of your team will grow stronger as you show that you really do care. Remember, the word of encouragement or act of kindness you give today can live in another person’s heart forever.

When we manage Soldiers, our actions speak louder than words. We can’t treat everyone exactly the same, ignoring their backgrounds and personalities. Ask yourself if you are an effective leader when you dictate orders, refuse feedback or are abusive when giving corrective direction. By recognizing your Soldiers’ individuality, leaders can motivate them on a personal level and hold them to the same standards on a team level. When Soldiers know that their input is respected, they’re more likely to offer ideas and solutions which can lead to better mission accomplishment, unit readiness, and can translate into better evaluations and ratings for everyone. As a leader, the final decision remains yours, but accepting and understanding the ideas, options and solutions of subordinates is a win-win for everyone.

Common courtesy is a simple act. For example, while you may like to play loud music in your car, others around you may not appreciate your choice of Metallica, Garth Brooks or Jay-Z. Turning it down is a courtesy act and much appreciated by others. Another way of looking at it, would you consider someone sticking their finger in your face a violation of your personal space? If so, if others are able to hear your choice of music, are you not violating someone else’s personal space? Remember, by exhibiting common courtesy leaders are setting a standard for others to emulate and investing in the future of the Army.

Those with questions or concerns about common courtesy or other issues, should call the Inspector General’s Office, 533.2369.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Cyber-Security-Scout-Article-06OCT2014

October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month

U.S. Army graphic by Lawrence Boyd “You Are the First Line of Defense.” That is the message those who are responsible for the defense of the Army’s networks wants to get out to the rest of the Army during National Cyber S...
 
 

Depression awareness showcased during month of October

Stand To! In observance of October as National Depression Awareness Month, the U.S. Army will join several organizations across America to inform the public about the signs and symptoms of depression. The public will learn the importance of seeking treatment and will be provided information about the availability of free online anonymous behavioral health screenings....
 
 

Robin Williams — could someone have helped?

I haven’t been able to talk about it until now, but I was really angry that Robin Williams committed suicide. I have been a fan of Williams since the Mork and Mindy days and always admired how much he had going for him. I knew he had problems, but somehow never considered that suicide could...
 

 
DoD

DOD recognizes commitment to prevent sexual assault

WASHINGTON — The Defense Department Wednesday honored exceptional groups and individuals from each military component who contributed an innovative idea or approach to positively impact sexual assault prevention and response programs. The Sexual Assault Prevention Innovation Award recognizes Service members and DOD Civilians whose work in support of service members has been particularly notew...
 
 

Trick-or-treat hours set for Fort Huachuca Oct. 31

Fort Huachuca Halloween trick-or-treating will take place Oct. 31 from 6 – 8 p.m. for children under 14. Children 9 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Standard access requirements for the installation remain in effect. This includes the requirement that everyone 16 and over entering the installation provide a valid picture identification and...
 
 

VA processes more than 1.3 million veterans’ claims in FY14

WASHINGTON — More than 1.3 million veterans received decisions on their Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) disability compensation and pension claims in fiscal year 2014 — the highest number in VA’s history, surpassing last year’s record-breaking production by more than 150,000 claims. This second year of record-breaking production comes as VA continues to transform the...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin