Local

January 11, 2013

PTSD support provided by man’s best friend

Bogey, a current Soldier’s Best Friend student, poses after a training session at Wal-Mart. Vicki Brown, a Soldier’s Best Friend trainer, and Bogey’s owner worked with Bogey on tasks such as blocking, focusing while amongst multiple distractions, and staying to one side of his owner.

For some current and former Soldiers, the furry companion by their side is much more than just a best friend. Soldier’s Best Friend is an Arizona non-profit organization that assists veterans with disabilities such as Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or Traumatic Brain Injury, by pairing them with a canine and training the animal as a service or therapeutic companion dog.

John Burnham, an Arizona veterinary doctor since 1983, started SBF in January 2011. The organization is based out of Glendale, but there are teams located and services offered in Tempe, Prescott, Tucson and Sierra Vista.

Service dogs and therapeutic companion dogs can provide assistance in various ways to help veterans dealing with the symptoms of PTSD and TBI. Once approved for the training program, the veteran and the selected dog will go through a five to seven month-long training period. Basic tasks that the dog will be trained to do, depending on the needs of the veteran, are traveling beside him or her to ease anxiety in crowds, block approaching persons, provide emotional support, aid in physical disabilities such as walking, fetching items as needed, provide hearing assistance, and much more.

Jim Cleven, human resource specialist, Civilian Personnel Advisory Center and a recent graduate of the SBF program, explained that having a service dog has helped him in many areas of his life. His dog, Spirit, assists with PTSD symptoms and provides hearing assistance as well.

Cleven said, “I obtained my dog, Spirit, on October 30, 2011 from a rescue group in Tucson. After a home visit by SBF, my application was approved and we started classes on November 19. On December 6, Spirit started coming to work with me. We trained daily during lunch and at home, along with [weekly] training sessions that were provided by SBF, here in Sierra Vista.

After six months of training, Spirit graduated, along with five others, on May 20, 2012. He goes everywhere with me and has been on five airline flights, one being a week-long [work assignment] to Maryland. Training, working and living with a service dog is rewarding in many ways.”

This service is offered to all active duty and veterans who can complete the training program locally in Arizona, upon acceptance to the program and is of no cost to the veteran. According to the SBF website, “All veterinary services, most food and supplies will be at no charge to the veteran during the training process. Following graduation, the veteran will be responsible for food costs and basic care. Reduced veterinary fees will be offered through a group of volunteer veterinary hospitals in Arizona.”

The dogs that are chosen as companions are often adopted from rescue groups or shelters. Veterans may choose to use a dog of their choice, but there are characteristics that can prevent acceptance to the program, such as any kind of aggressive behavior, anxiety or nervousness, and the maturity level and age of dog. Evaluations are performed to determine canine acceptance.

Rocky Boatman, a SBF team lead, explains. “A veteran hears about SBF and applies online or calls them and requests a service dog. There is paperwork involved to ensure the client has PTSD or TBI and falls within the guidelines. Once the paperwork is approved, John [Burnham] comes down from Phoenix and visits the home of veterans who want a service dog and has been preapproved. If the home visit goes well … and they have a dog already, he will start the evaluation of the dog at that time to ensure that the dog is suitable [to be] a service dog. Once John is done on his side of the house, he lets me know that the client has been approved. I do an evaluation with the dog itself, the temperament testing, and I will sit down with the client and talk about what the dog needs to be trained for.” The application process time can vary, depending on the applicant’s circumstances.

For general questions or to start the application process, visit http://soldiersbestfriend.org/ or call 1.480.269.1738.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Community Briefs February 27, 2014

Military/Veteran Community Summit The City of Sierra Vista is partnering with Arizona organizations to host a community summit for veterans, Service members, and their families in a networking event designed to bring the military community and support organizations together. The Community Summit will be held at the City of Sierra Vista Fire Station #3, 675...
 
 
Photo-1-for-top-of-page

Soldier with heart for young people coaches wrestling teams

Sgt. 1st Class John Rivera Jr., an operations and administrative non-commissioned officer with the U.S. Army Electronic Proving Ground, works on wrestling holds with Buena High School students Cahan Sasica (left) and Jordan Rit...
 
 
Amanda Kraus Rodriguez

IMCOM human capital plan shapes 2025 workforce, builds legacy

Amanda Kraus Rodriguez Dana Davis, a financial management specialist at U.S. Army Installation Management Command Europe Region headquarters and member of the SHCP working group, prepares draft copies of the Strategic Human Cap...
 

 

Budget cuts made at FH Barnes Field House

Classes taught by instructors at Barnes Field House Fitness Center are no longer free due to a 23 – 25 percent annual operating budget cut implemented in January. “We’re a fully funded [facility] at the beginning of the year,” said Les Woods, chief of Sports, Fitness and Aquatics, Directorate of Family and Morale, Welfare and...
 
 

Presidential Proclamation – National African American History Month, 2015 NATIONAL AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY MONTH, 2015 BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

A PROCLAMATION For generations, the story of American progress has been shaped by the inextinguishable beliefs that change is always possible and a brighter future lies ahead. With tremendous strength and abiding resolve, our ancestors — some of whom were brought to this land in chains — have woven their resilient dignity into the fabric...
 
 
Air Force Master Sgt. Adrian Cadiz

Carter took office Tuesday as 25th defense secretary

Air Force Master Sgt. Adrian Cadiz Incoming Secretary of Defense Ash Carter arrives at the Pentagon to assume duties as the newly appointed Secretary of Defense, Tuesday. WASHINGTON — Ash Carter became the 25th secretary of d...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin