U.S.

January 25, 2013

Military Intelligence — this week in history: January 25, 2013

USS Pueblo (AGER-2) off San Diego, Oct. 19, 1967, was captured by North Korea on Jan. 23, 1968. The ship is still held by North Korea today, currently moored in the Taedong River in Pyongyang and used as a museum ship.

USS Pueblo comes under attack
Jan. 23, 1968
The USS Pueblo, initially an Army general purpose supply vessel, was built in 1944. Although retired in 1954, it came back into service in 1966 under Operation Clickbeetle, a joint Naval Intelligence and National Security Agency, or NSA, effort. The operation involved converting cargo ships to spy vessels outfitted with state-of-the art equipment to intercept signals communications. The repairs involved creating a metal room known as the Sod Hut, where technicians operated the surveillance gear to intercept and gather sonar, radar and other types of signals communications. Clickbeetle was actually inspired by Soviet surveillance operations dating back to the late 1950s.

On Jan. 11, 1968, the Pueblo left Japan for its first mission and set off for the coast of North Korea. For two weeks, it operated relatively quietly outside North Korea, until one day North Korean ships surrounded it. Attempting to flee, the Pueblo was attacked which resulted in the death of one sailor. The spy ship surrendered and the remaining 82 crew members were taken prisoner by the North Koreans.

Prior to capture, the crew was unable to destroy the classified equipment and documents on the ship. Axes and sledgehammers proved useless against the metal-encased equipment, and the shredders and the incinerator for the documents were also worthless. As a backup plan, documents were put in weighted bags and thrown overboard, a futile exercise as the Pueblo operated off the coast.

While the Johnson administration’s report concluded that the damage was “not vital,” the administration quietly expressed sentiments that reflected otherwise. An intelligence estimate concluded that the Soviets had gained three to five years on the Americans in the race for communications technology. President Lyndon Johnson feared the Soviets would be able to catch up within a single year. Hours after the capture, a plane flew from Pyongyang to Moscow, carrying 790 pounds of cargo believed to be from the Pueblo. In addition, the NSA intercepted a transmission from North Korea to the Soviet Union containing a cryptographic guidebook from the ship. The KW7 code radio represented the greatest loss as it was the most sophisticated piece of equipment.

Source: Excerpt from an article by Mitchell Lerner, Professor of History at Ohio State University, “The Pueblo Incident: A Spy Ship and the Failure of American Foreign Policy.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Stephanie Caffall

Fort Huachuca volunteers recognized at luncheon

Stephanie Caffall Guests gather at the Volunteer Recognition Luncheon Wednesday to celebrate the dedication and community service of Fort Huachuca’s volunteers. The 2015 Fort Huachuca Volunteer Recognition Luncheon was hosted...
 
 
Natalie Lakosil

40th ESB holds change of responsibility ceremony

Natalie Lakosil Outgoing Command Sgt. Maj. John Reinburg snaps the non-commissioned officer’s sword closed signifying his last official act as the command sergeant major and thereby cutting his ties to the unit. The 40th Expe...
 
 

Army Volunteer Corps shares philosophy on volunteerism

Special to The Scout Volunteering is a defining part of the American experience. From the Minutemen at Lexington to today’s all volunteer force, the Army relies on the fundamental connection between volunteerism and citizenship. The strength of the Army lies in its Soldiers, and the strength of Army communities lies in the talents and contributions...
 

 
Natalie Lakosil

305th MI Bn. hosts Resiliency Rodeo for busy Soldiers

Natalie Lakosil In front of his Soldiers, Command Sgt. Maj. Edward Baptiste, 305th Military Intelligence Battalion, helps demonstrate Bronco’s military woroking dog capabilities with the help of handler Pfc. Gabby Giffiths, 1...
 
 
Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kristine Smedley

NCO Week recognizes professionalism, dedication of Soldiers

Photo by Sgt. 1st Class Kristine Smedley Fifty-two Soldiers were inducted into the Noncommissioned Officer Corps on April 8 at Cochise College during NCO Week here. Fort Huachuca celebrated its first Noncommissioned Officer Wee...
 
 
DeCA photo

Commissary customer appreciation Stateside case lot sales return to offer up to 50 percent or more savings

DeCA photo Cases of groceries are lined up in a tent next to the commissary at Fort Lee, Virginia. Commissary Customer Appreciation Sales allow patrons an opportunity to save up to 50 percent or more on club-pack and full-case ...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin