U.S.

January 25, 2013

Military Intelligence — this week in history: January 25, 2013

USS Pueblo (AGER-2) off San Diego, Oct. 19, 1967, was captured by North Korea on Jan. 23, 1968. The ship is still held by North Korea today, currently moored in the Taedong River in Pyongyang and used as a museum ship.

USS Pueblo comes under attack
Jan. 23, 1968
The USS Pueblo, initially an Army general purpose supply vessel, was built in 1944. Although retired in 1954, it came back into service in 1966 under Operation Clickbeetle, a joint Naval Intelligence and National Security Agency, or NSA, effort. The operation involved converting cargo ships to spy vessels outfitted with state-of-the art equipment to intercept signals communications. The repairs involved creating a metal room known as the Sod Hut, where technicians operated the surveillance gear to intercept and gather sonar, radar and other types of signals communications. Clickbeetle was actually inspired by Soviet surveillance operations dating back to the late 1950s.

On Jan. 11, 1968, the Pueblo left Japan for its first mission and set off for the coast of North Korea. For two weeks, it operated relatively quietly outside North Korea, until one day North Korean ships surrounded it. Attempting to flee, the Pueblo was attacked which resulted in the death of one sailor. The spy ship surrendered and the remaining 82 crew members were taken prisoner by the North Koreans.

Prior to capture, the crew was unable to destroy the classified equipment and documents on the ship. Axes and sledgehammers proved useless against the metal-encased equipment, and the shredders and the incinerator for the documents were also worthless. As a backup plan, documents were put in weighted bags and thrown overboard, a futile exercise as the Pueblo operated off the coast.

While the Johnson administration’s report concluded that the damage was “not vital,” the administration quietly expressed sentiments that reflected otherwise. An intelligence estimate concluded that the Soviets had gained three to five years on the Americans in the race for communications technology. President Lyndon Johnson feared the Soviets would be able to catch up within a single year. Hours after the capture, a plane flew from Pyongyang to Moscow, carrying 790 pounds of cargo believed to be from the Pueblo. In addition, the NSA intercepted a transmission from North Korea to the Soviet Union containing a cryptographic guidebook from the ship. The KW7 code radio represented the greatest loss as it was the most sophisticated piece of equipment.

Source: Excerpt from an article by Mitchell Lerner, Professor of History at Ohio State University, “The Pueblo Incident: A Spy Ship and the Failure of American Foreign Policy.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
square

A local take on America’s PrepareAthon!

Over the month of April events have been taking place nationwide to help ensure America’s preparedness in the event of an emergency. America’s PrepareAthon is a grassroots movement that highlights the importance of prepared...
 
 
Stephanie Caffall

Second ‘Take Back Night’ hosted at Cochise College

Stephanie Caffall Rick Mueller, mayor, City of Sierra Vista, spoke at the Take Back the Night event and encouraged the community to put an end to sexual assault and harassment. Fort Huachuca and the Sierra Vista community joine...
 
 

BLUE BORDER MESSAGE / SEXUAL ASSAULT CASE COMPLETED

At a court martial on 25 March 2015, a Second Lieutenant, U.S. Army, was tried for committing sexual acts on multiple occasions by causing bodily harm. The 2LT pled not guilty, but was found guilty to the charge of sexual assault. On 27 March 2015, the 2LT was sentenced to a dismissal. The sexual assault...
 

 
Stephanie Caffall

Installation Retirement Ceremony honors retirees

Stephanie Caffall Fourteen Soldiers, one Department of Army Civilian and their guests await the formal recognition portion of the Installation Retirement Ceremony Friday on Brown Parade Field. Fort Huachuca honored 14 Soldiers ...
 
 
Natalie Lakosil

Holocaust Remembrance Day Observance reminds crowd of valuable lessons

Natalie Lakosil Lily Brull, Holocaust survivor, receives a poem, flowers and homemade Challah bread from Malachi, 4, and Kayalynn Fiddes, 8, after speaking about her experience as a Holocaust survivor. Lily Brull was only 10 ye...
 
 
U.S. Army photo

Military Intelligence – Moment in MI history

U.S., Britain agree to share communications intelligence U.S. Army photo Maj. Melvin C. Helfers evaluated ULTRA, or Special Intelligence, and presented it to Gen. George Patton. The BRUSA Agreement severely restricted access to...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin