U.S.

February 22, 2013

Black history celebrated on FH in spite of inclement weather

Tags:
Staff Sgt. Kelvin Ringold
11th Signal Brigade Public Affairs Officer

Pastor T.L. Simpson, senior chaplain, New Jerusalem Community Church, talks to the crowd about the significance of Black History Month. Simpson was the guest speaker at Wednesday’s Black American History event at the Thunder Mountain Activity Centre on Fort Huachuca.

Snow and inclement weather did not prevent Fort Huachuca from recognizing African Americans or their place in U.S. History this month. As planned, the Black History Month celebration was held on Wednesday at the Thunder Mountain Activity Centre. The theme for this year’s observance was, “At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality: The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington.”

There are a number of significant accomplishments in African-American history, from the Underground Railroad to the Buffalo Soldiers and their military role. During February, the nation recognizes the African-American pioneers who played important roles through their contributions in shaping this country.

“We are here to celebrate and acknowledge the vital and significant role that African-Americans have played within the development and progress of our country over the past 37 years,” said Command Sgt. Maj. Todd Holiday, command sergeant major, U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence.

The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washington, D.C. were two important turning points in African-American history and led to them being singled out as the theme of this year’s event.

In 1863, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation. As a war measure, the proclamation freed slaves in rebel states that were not under Union control. Although it did not free every slave at the time, it paved the way for the passage of the 13th Amendment, ending slavery in the United States.

One hundred years later in 1963, a turning point in the battle for civil rights occurred in Washington, D.C. Approximately a quarter of a million people, both black and white, marched from the Washington Monument to the Lincoln Memorial as both a protest and show of togetherness between the two races. During this event, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

February, Black History Month, is a time when all Americans can learn about and understand the struggles and achievements that African-Americans faced from the beginning of slavery until now, said Staff Sgt. Daniel Willis, chaplain assistant, 11th Signal Brigade. People should not allow their children, or their children’s children to forget the importance of Black History month so that history is not repeated, he explained.

From left, Joe Brown, Johnny Cruz, Keleigh Williams and Daniella Conde, members of the Buena High School Choir, performed the national anthem for those in attendance at the Black History Month celebration.

This year’s guest speaker was Pastor T.L. Simpson, senior pastor of the New Jerusalem Community Church. Simpson served for 22 years in the U.S. Army as a military intelligence specialist and now works as the executive officer to the deputy commanding general of Fort Huachuca as a Department of the Army civilian.

As Simpson looked back on the battles and conflicts for equality in the United States, he noted both the accomplishments of African-Americans and the fact that there is still more work to do.

“No one can argue that this nation achieved its greatness as a result of all ethnicities, nationalities, religions, and sexes,” said Simpson. “It has been a long road and yet an even longer journey to travel.”

Soldiers and other service members are taught to live up to standards [such as Army Values and the Soldier’s Creed] which keep them grounded and more capable of treating the rest of humanity with dignity and respect. This concept goes a long way during the observance of Black History Month, the speaker explained.

With that in mind, Col. Roger Sangvic, commander, U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence and Fort Huachuca, made a similar observation during his closing remarks.

“Even though we have an African-American who is president of the United States, we have a long, long way to go [to achieving equality for everyone],” he said. “Not everyone thinks the same way we do here in this auditorium.”

People have overcome many obstacles and accomplished many goals throughout history to better the lives of not only African-Americans, but all U.S citizens. The success the nation has achieved thus far can only be sustained and improved on through teamwork, compassion, understanding and vigilance, the speakers explained.

“Let us move together as a people to help improve this road called ‘freedom and equality,’” said Simpson.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Stephanie Caffall

Women’s history showcased during special event Wednesday

Stephanie Caffall Fort Huachuca’s Thunder Mountain Activity Centre was the site of an event titled, “Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives” Wednesday in celebration for National Women’s History Month. After the reading...
 
 
DoD

DOD warns troops, families to be cyber crime smart

WASHINGTON — Defense Department employees and their families should be vigilant when guarding personal and work information from expanding cyber-criminal activity, and to know how to recognize scammer tactics, according to DOD’s chief information officer. Terry Halvorsen issued a DOD-wide memorandum March 18 about the growing threat of cybercrime “phishing” and “spear phishing” in e...
 
 

Army health leaders advocate for importance of nutrition

WASHINGTON — During National Nutrition Month in March, “we encourage each of you to renew a commitment to achieving your personal Performance Triad goals,” said Army Surgeon General Lt. Gen. Patricia Horoho. This year’s theme is “Bite into a Healthy Lifestyle,” she said. The Performance Triad focuses on the importance of sleep, activity and nutrition...
 

 
Natalie Lakosil

Convoy exercise helps ready 111th MI Bde. for emergencies

Natalie Lakosil Soldiers from the 111th Military Intelligence Brigade take a short rest in lower Garden Canyon before returning to the motor pool as part of a convoy training exercise Wednesday. The exercise helps the brigade s...
 
 

Fort Huachuca Criminal Punishment Bulletin – February

For the month of February, in addition to Court-Martial and U.S. Federal Court Proceedings, 31 Soldiers were disciplined under Article 15, UCMJ; and 25 Soldiers were administratively separated, including 2 for misconduct. The following are notable recent criminal proceedings: A specialist assigned to the 40th Expeditionary Signal Battalion was tried at a General Court-Martial. The...
 
 
Natalie Lakosil

111th MI Bde. NCO, Soldier, Platoon Sgt. of Quarter winners selected

Natalie Lakosil Sgt. Jason Grider, Alpha Company, 309th Military Intelligence Battalion, inspects uniforms during the in-ranks inspection portion of the 111th Military Intelligence Brigade Non-commissioned Officer of the Quarte...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin