Local

April 5, 2013

Adopt a pet, save a life, swell a heart

The Sierra Vista Animal Care and Control facility has dogs and cats of all ages and sizes available for adoption. Adoption includes spaying/neutering, microchipping and the first set of vaccinations (if required.)

Bringing home a new furry friend can be the beginning of a wonderful and rewarding relationship, and adopting from a local animal shelter should be the place to begin the search.

In 2012, the Sierra Vista Animal Care and Control took in more than 3,000 animals. According to www.adoptapet.com, approximately four million adoptable dogs and cats are killed each year due mainly to overpopulation. Adopting from a local shelter gives abandoned pets a needed home, saves their lives and can possibly prevent excessive animal reproduction.

While adopting a family pet is not a difficult process, there are many things to consider before making the decision. Be sure that the entire family agrees with the adoption, is ready to make the long-term commitment and that every member is willing to help ease the transition of the pet into its new home. Compare the family budget and the cost of owning a pet to ensure there will not be financial strain. Most importantly, make sure the family schedule allows ample opportunity to spend quality time with the new pet.

Once the decision is made to adopt, visit the local animal shelter to see what potential ‘friends’ are available. If you see one you like, ask to take it out for a walk, play with it and get to know the animal. If there are children in the family, bring them along to be sure they and the animal interact well.

If other animals are already in the home, bring them to the shelter and let them interact, as well. And if there is any uncertainty, take a break and come back on another day. Professionals recommend multiple visits.

It costs $25 to adopt a dog or cat from the Sierra Vista Animal Care and Control Facility. According to their policy, this includes an examination by the veterinarian, vaccinations, spay or neuter and a microchip. If the dog or cat requires a series of vaccinations, the adoption fee will only cover the first set of vaccinations, to include the rabies vaccination.

A volunteer works on socialization with a timid terrier mix that is available for adoption at the Sierra Vista Animal Care and Control facility. Animals are often turned in or rescued from negligent situations and need extra attention and dedication to rebuild trust with new owners. It is important to consider the entire situation when deciding on a new furry friend.

Once the family makes the decision to adopt, it is important to prepare the future home for the pet’s arrival. Decide where the new family member will sleep and eat. Purchase animal bedding, toys, bowls, food, a collar, a leash and treats before going to get the new animal. Ease the dog or cat into the new surroundings, keeping children calm and voices, TVs or other media at a low volume, and the house quiet and peaceful.

Don’t be alarmed if the new pet is not as active as it was at the animal shelter as it is common for an animal’s nerves to prevent playfulness in a brand-new environment. As the dog or cat gets comfortable in its new surroundings, its activity level should increase.

Judy Kershner, Sierra Vista Animal Care and Control customer service representative, said, “It is important for people to realize that [pet adoption] is not a 10-minute commitment. It’s a lifetime commitment. We see all the time people are excited, and then we see [the adopted pet] on craigslist and it says ‘No time for dog.’ They need to understand the commitment that they are making is for the life of the animal, not just for their pleasure. The more time that they spend with it, the better the dog is going to be.”

Dedication, detailed preparation and well-planned first days are ingredients for a smooth and simple adoption process. Do ample online research or visit the local library, avoid rushing the search, and spend as much time getting to know the animal before it comes home. Following these tips and hints gets the perfect companion for the perfect family.

People who are interested in adopting should visit the local animal shelters located in Benson, Bisbee, Douglas, Huachuca City, Wilcox, Tombstone and Sierra Vista. For location addresses, visit www.cochise.az.gov/cochise_sheriff.aspx?id=2528.

Over 3,000 animals were taken in to the Sierra Vista Animal Care and Control in 2012. Over 40 kennels are available to house the rescued dogs, with information cards that display what information is known about them. Getting to know the dog that you may be interested in adopting is important, and encouraged, with a large outdoor area to let the dog out and play for a while.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Lisa Ferdinando

Army releases latest policies on female hairstyles, tattoos

Lisa Ferdinando 1st Sgt. Aki Paylor won’t have any trouble recalling the Warrior Ethos. “For me, the Warrior Ethos — that’s who I am.” Since all of Paylor’s tattoos were done a number of years ago, he’s grandfathe...
 
 

Combined Federal Campaign now underway on FH

The annual Combined Federal Campaign, CFC, is currently underway and ends Dec. 1. The CFC is the world’s largest and most successful annual workplace charity campaign with more than 200 CFC campaigns throughout the country to help raise millions of dollars each year, officials say. This year’s theme is “We Make it Possible.” Donations made...
 
 

It’s a Thin Line for prescription use, misuse, abuse; dispose of unused drugs Sept. 27

SAN ANTONIO — Nearly one out of 20 Soldiers misuse painkillers, says the website Army Thin Line. The website is part of a campaign designed to educate Soldiers, their friends and Families and the provider community about the dangers of prescription drug misuse and abuse. Army Thin Line encourages safe and responsible decisions when using...
 

 
PatriotDay1_20140911_Hidalgo

Fort Huachuca Community remembers the fallen

Soldiers place the wreaths for the Patriot Day Ceremony at Brown Parade Field on Fort Huachuca Sept. 11. The wreaths honored all who fell during the 9/11 attacks on the U.S. Fort Huachuca firefighters raise the American Flag at...
 
 
Photos by Eric Hortin, NETCOM

NETCOM honors deceased members during special ceremony

Photos by Eric Hortin, NETCOM From left, Maj. Gen. John Morrison Jr., Network Enterprise Technology Command commanding general, Command Sgt. Maj. Stephfon Watson, NETCOM command sergeant major, and Spc. Kyle Baker, NETCOM Headq...
 
 

Army Reserve training brigade moves to Fort Huachuca

Headquarters, 1st Brigade (Military Intelligence) 100th Training Division (Operational Support) will possibly relocate from Providence, Rhode Island, to Fort Huachuca pending approval from the Department of the Army. If approved, this action will transfer 72 positions here. Fifty-eight of those positions will be part-time reservists who will only be here one weekend a month for...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin