Army

April 12, 2013

CSLA training center uses adapter, saves money, time, lives

Maranda Flynn
Staff writer

In 2012, Don Meyer, an instructor with the Communications Security Logistics Activity, or CSLA, New Equipment Training team here, created a solution that simplified their In-Line Network Encryptor, or INE, KG-175D training course with a short-term savings to the Army of more than $25,000.

Previous to his solution, each student in the course was required to have two laptop computers to handled red or black operations, due to the lack of multiple Ethernet ports on each. Meyer connected a Universal Serial Bus, or USB, switch to the computers, allowing the Ethernet connection to be made using a USB port.

Introducing this solution alleviated the need for two computers per student, reducing the expenses involved in purchasing and maintaining the hardware, as well as shipping the computers to offsite training locations. Twice as many students can now be trained, minimizing travel costs for multiple trips.
He had mentioned the idea over a year ago, but the proposal requirements were intense and the time was not available. Eventually, Meyer was instructed to move forward with the idea. With paperwork assistance from a coworker, Guy Cook, Meyer submitted the proposal and it was accepted.

When asked how he felt about his contribution, Meyer said that his main concern was training more personnel effectively, and ensuring they understand the equipment. Incorporating this solution can prevent them from having to move from their physical location, they can just send their information over the network.

Meyer retired from the Army after 22 years as an equipment installer. Prior to becoming an instructor at Fort Huachuca in 2009, Meyer spent two years in Iraq training U.S. Marines on modern equipment for use in the field.

This minor adjustment has proved to be an invaluable solution for the CSLA New Equipment Training team, but it has not yet been approved for use in theater.

(Information compiled from a personal interview and news release by the U.S. Army Communications-Electronics Command Public Affairs.)




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