Health & Safety

May 24, 2013

Water can be friend or foe – it depends on you

Water is necessary to sustain life. Without water, humans could not survive for more than a few days.

However, water can also be deadly. Under the wrong circumstances, people, especially infants, have drowned in just a few inches.

The summer recreation season is here, and even in Arizona, people will take to pools, lakes, ponds and creeks to beat the heat and partake in water sports, fishing or other forms of recreation that involve getting wet.

Enjoy the water, but do so safely.

Learn to swim

According to the American Red Cross website redcross.org, it’s the best thing anyone can do to stay safe in and around the water. It’s never too early to begin. Those with young children can enroll them in the SKIESUnlimited youth swim program on Fort Huachuca. It begins in June, and registration is already underway. For more information, call 538.6219/6319.

Supervision is key

On Fort Huachuca, both Irwin and Barnes Field House Pool have two lifeguards on duty at all times during operating hours. In quarters, adults or guardians should ensure no child is allowed to be in or around kiddie pools unsupervised. Drowning can occur within only a few minutes.

If living and having a pool off post, use a pool cover when not swimming. Keep pool gates closed and locked when no responsible person is available to supervise young or inexperienced people who might be tempted to swim or play in the water.

Either on or off post, even with supervision, inexperienced swimmers should wear U.S. Coast Guard-approved personal flotation devices.

Set water safety rules

Set water safety rules for the whole family based on swimming abilities. For example, inexperienced swimmers should stay in water less than chest deep.

Avoid dangerous ‘too’s’

Too tired, too cold, too far from safety, too inexperienced – the dangerous “too’s” can get people in trouble while in the water, both in and out of supervised swim areas.

“Weak or inexperienced swimmers get in the deep end of the pool and panic,” said Brittany Whiteley, Fort Huachuca aquatics manager. “Or during lap swim, adults who set too great a goal get tired or exhausted, weak or get leg cramps, that’s where we see the biggest problems,” she added.

Use buddy system

Whether swimming, boating, kayaking, tubing, fishing or partaking in other activities in and around the water, do so with a friend. If leaving the area, let someone know exactly where you’re going and when you’ll be back.

Water-related injuries usually increase during the summer as people take to popular area lakes and other bodies of water. “Watercraft injuries are due mainly to inexperience with equipment or mixing alcohol with water operations. [Accidents also happen as the result of] swimming in areas where there is no lifeguard on duty as well as swimming in non-designated areas,” said Dan Orta, Safety director. He also explained that accidents happen to people who can’t swim and who are not wearing flotation devices when out on the water.

“I recommend keeping out of water in areas where no lifeguard is on duty,” Orta added. “This includes areas such as the pond by Lakeside Terraces on post, Parker Canyon Lake, Patagonia Lake and other areas not designated or staffed as swimming areas.”

Alcohol, drugs, water don’t mix

Do not mix alcohol with swimming, diving or boating. Alcohol impairs judgment, balance and coordination. It affects swimming and diving skills, and reduces the body’s ability to stay warm.

Watch weather, sunshine

Pay attention to local weather conditions and forecasts. To avoid potential problems, leave the water at the first indication of bad weather.

Use sunscreen lavishly, and reapply it often. It’s even possible to get badly sunburned on a cloudy day. If swimming, put on sunscreen whenever you leave the water.

Hydrate frequently

Even when a person is immersed in water, dehydration is possible. Take frequent hydration breaks, and ensure children do the same. It’s best to stick to plain water or natural juices and avoid caffeinated or sugary drinks.

To learn more about identifying and mitigating summer related hazards, go to the Army Combat Readiness Safety Center at https://safety.army.mil/multimedia/CAMPAIGNSINITIATIVES/KnowtheSigns/tabid/2369/Default.aspx.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
fire-pic

Arrival of monsoon signals easing of fire restrictions in Southeast Arizona

TUCSON, Ariz. – Effective July 11, the Bureau of Land Management Gila District, all districts of the Coronado National Forest, Saguaro National Park, Casa Grande Ruins National Monument, Coronado National Memorial, Chiricahua...
 
 

Monsoon start means break from hot weather — keep safety in mind this summer

In Arizona, as in other regions of the world including India and Thailand, we experience a monsoon, a season of high temperatures, high winds, and high moisture, resulting in potentially deadly weather. The term “monsoon” comes from the Arabic “mausim,” meaning “season” or “wind shift.” Even though rain doesn’t typically begin in the southern Arizona...
 
 

Melanoma – silent but deadly

Do you love having fun in the sun? If you do, it is essential you protect your skin from exposure to harmful sun rays known to cause skin cancer. Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States, and melanoma is the deadliest skin cancer. According to the National Cancer Institute, more...
 

 

Army dentists fight uphill battle against sugar

Consultant to the Surgeon General for Dental Public Health Sugar is being called “the new tobacco.” Its many forms have been linked to the increasing rates of diabetes, heart disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and other chronic diseases in the U.S. Army dentists have been fighting on the front lines against sugar for decades. Despite...
 
 

DUI Memorial Vehicle is reminder of dangers of drinking, driving

An SUV with a crumpled front end and dented doors has been transformed into a symbol of the ultimate cost of driving under the influence — the death of a friend or loved one. The black SUV is emblazoned with 262 white crosses, one for each person killed in 2013 in a DUI-related accident in...
 
 

ACS shares disaster preparedness information, ERP news, class dates

Ready Army, special needs Families Army Community Service, ACS, Exceptional Family Program, EFMP, shares information from the Ready Army website. Ready Army is the Army’s proactive campaign to increase the resilience of the Army community and enhance the readiness of the force by informing Soldiers, their Families, Army Civilians and contractors of relevant hazards and...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin