Army

June 7, 2013

Soldiers to see fewer PCS moves in future

WASHINGTON – The Army would like its enlisted Soldiers to remain on station for at least 36 months, and career managers are aiming to see that they will, said a director from Human Resource Command.

In late 2012, senior Army leaders “asked us to look for ways to increase unit readiness, stability and predictability for Soldiers and Families,” said Col. Robert Bennett, director, Enlisted Personnel Management Directorate.

Keeping Soldiers on station for a longer period of time would accomplish those goals, said Bennett, who said he met with leaders in his directorate to go over options and implementation of the plan.

There are exceptions

The increase in time-on-station is affecting most, but not all of around 432,000 enlisted Soldiers. There are multiple exceptions to the effort to keep Soldiers on station for 36 months.

The most important of those exceptions is deployment, Bennett said. If there is a need for Soldiers to deploy, then the mission comes first, he said.

The Army also has several high-demand career field positions, such as recruiters and drill sergeants. If the Army needs Soldiers to fill those positions, that too would be a reason to move a Soldier to a new location before they complete 36 months at a duty station. Special duty positions such as in the intelligence community or at the White House Communications Agency, for example, are also exceptions.

Professional development of Soldiers is also an exception, Bennett said. For example, if a staff sergeant gets promoted to sergeant first class, he or she might be moved to fill a billet that is more commensurate with their increased rank and ability to lead.

Soldiers with special needs children might also be exempted from the time-on-station effort. For example, Bennett said, a Soldier may get a compassionate reassignment to a location with better support for their special-needs child.

Soldiers assigned to Korea will continue to serve there for one year, not three. But existing policies for Soldiers assigned in Germany, Hawaii and Alaska remain unchanged; those Soldiers are already locked into three-year tours.

Finally, in the past, Soldiers have been offered the opportunity to choose a new duty station as part of a reenlistment option. The previous requirement for first-term Soldiers reenlisting was 12 months on station, Bennett said. That has now been increased to 24 months for priority 1 and 2 assignments, which include some units that are deploying, warrior transition units, ROTC cadre and other special assignments that have “senior leader emphasis.”

Re-enlisting Soldiers who choose follow-on assignments that are not priority 1 or 2 will likely have to remain on station the full 36 months before getting their location choice, Bennett said.

Tours return to normal

Prior to 9/11, three-year tours were the norm. It was overseas contingency operations in Iraq and Afghanistan that had Soldiers moving from one installation to the next with less than 36 months at one duty station. But as operations draw down, the Army’s goal of 36 months is pretty much being met right now, Bennett said.

Now, things are becoming more stable and predictable, and Bennett said he thinks Soldiers and their Families as a whole are appreciative of that.

On top of that, a reduction in permanent-change-of-station moves helps the Army save money, Bennett said.

“We want to make everyone happy,” he said. “But at the end of the day, it’s about Army requirements. That’s the driver.”

 




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Julianne E. Cochran

Help wanted: Enlisted aides in valued roles for Army leaders

Julianne E. Cochran An Enlisted Aide Training Course instructor shows a student the specifics of setting up a general officer’s uniform during a practical exercise. WASHINGTON – Enlisted aides are considered an elite group ...
 
 

CWFC supports Fort’s civilian employees

Fort Huachuca’s Civilian Welfare Fund Council (CWFC) uses the money derived from vending machines to support federal employees. Each month a percentage of the money from post snack and soda vending machines goes into a secured CWFC account to provide morale and recreational activities to civilian employees. According to Carmen Chastain, CWFC president, these activities...
 
 
Photo courtesy of Richard Grosinsky

Hunter unmanned aircraft system ends history here, leaves long legacy

Photo courtesy of Richard Grosinsky From that first Hunter unmanned aircraft system training class that graduated here April 27, 1992, to its final flight here July 10, Fort Huachuca’s UAS program continues to build on the vi...
 

 

Official participation in #GiveThem20 campaign not authorized

The Office of the Judge Advocate General has been notified by the DOD Standards of Conduct Office about an online social media campaign titled”#GiveThem20.” The action is supported by, and draws attention to, a national nonprofit organization called American Corporate Partners. The campaign is online at GiveThem20.org. The campaign proposes video recording yourself or a...
 
 

OPM announces steps to protect federal workers, others from cyber threats

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) announced July 15 the results of the interagency forensics investigation into a recent cyber incident involving federal background investigation data and the steps it is taking to protect those impacted. Throughout this investigation, OPM has been committed to providing information in a timely, transparent and accurate...
 
 
U.S. Army photo

Military Intelligence – Moment in MI history

Maj. Gen. Ralph Van Deman – Namesake of the East Gate U.S. Army photo Maj. Gen. Paul Menoher, commander of the US Army Intelligence Center, and Command Sgt. Maj. Art Johnson unveil the memorialization plaque at the Van Deman ...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>