Commentary

June 14, 2013

U.S. Army – 238 years old, still going strong

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U.S. Army Center of Military History

Today marks the Army’s 238th birthday, a time for Soldiers to celebrate their proud history of 238 years of service to the nation. On Monday morning, Secretary of the Army John McHugh (right) and Sgt. Maj. of the Army Raymond Chandler III laid a wreath at Mount Vernon, the home of George Washington, the first commander-in-chief and president. Check out this webpage and find your own way to mark the occasion: http://www.army.mil/birthday/238/. Army Strong!

When the American Revolution broke out, the rebellious colonies did not possess an army in the modern sense. Rather, the revolutionaries fielded an amateur force of colonial troops, cobbled together from various New England militia companies. They had no unified chain of command, and although Artemas Ward of Massachusetts exercised authority by informal agreement, officers from other colonies were not obligated to obey his orders. The American volunteers were led, equipped, armed, paid for and supported by the colonies from which they were raised.

In the spring of 1775, this “army” was about to confront British troops near Boston, Mass. The revolutionaries had to re-organize their forces quickly if they were to stand a chance against Britain’s seasoned professionals. Recognizing the need to enlist the support of all of the American seaboard colonies, the Massachusetts Provincial Congress appealed to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia to assume authority for the New England army.

Reportedly, at John Adams’ request, Congress voted to “adopt” the Boston troops on June 14, 1775, although there is no written record of this decision. Also on this day, Congress resolved to form a committee “to bring in a draft of rules and regulations for the government of the Army,” and voted $2 million to support the forces around Boston, and those at New York City. Moreover, Congress authorized the formation of 10 companies of expert riflemen from Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia, which were directed to march to Boston to support the New England militia.

George Washington received his appointment as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army the next day, and formally took command at Boston on July 3, 1775.
Happy Birthday, U.S. Army!




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