U.S.

June 28, 2013

Military Intelligence – this week in history

June 24, 1974

Brig. Gen. Harry Hiestand, U. S. Army Intelligence Center and School commanding general, hands a military intelligence “MI Magazine” inaugural edition plaque to Maj. Gen. Harold Aaron, Army assistant chief of staff for Intelligence, in 1974. The MI sphinx statue moved to Fort Huachuca the same year.

The move of the U. S. Army Intelligence Center and School, or USAICS, from Fort Holabird, Md., to Fort Huachuca in 1971 was an important step in the professionalization of the Military Intelligence, or MI Branch, which was only nine years old by that time. Much organizational turbulence would follow within the next few years, as four separate intelligence organizations merged into a fully integrated center and school.

Brig. Gen. Harry Hiestand, the first general officer to command USAICS, commented in the Annual Historical Summary that 1974 marked USAICS’ recognition as “THE Intelligence Center for the United States Army.” As part of that recognition, the commander encouraged a high level of dialogue between USAICS and MI units worldwide, “on as informal a basis as possible” in order to allow USAICS to refine training and combat development documents to keep them in line with the “real world.”

“MI Magazine” was part of that effort. The first issue was published on June 24, 1974, and it would continue to be published quarterly from then on, eventually evolving into today’s “Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin,” or “MIPB.” Its intent was to ensure an informal but highly productive media for contact with the field.

Capt. Terry Bearce, the first editor, noted that the magazine was a professional development tool of USAICS, but that it was intended for all Army intelligence personnel – military and civilian – and, due to its status as an authorized but unofficial publication, it could be used as a forum for open discussion of new ideas, concepts and areas of Army intelligence interest that needed and deserved discussion.

First-Edition-Cover

The inaugural issue of “MI Magazine” included an article by Maj. Gen. Harold Aaron, the assistant chief of staff for Intelligence, titled “The Soviet Armed Forces Today,” giving an analysis of the capabilities of the Soviet military from a perspective in the midst of the Cold War. Other featured articles included “Have Training Team – Will Travel” by Cpt. Michael J. O’Shea and Lt. Edward V. Grange, Jr., and “Integrated Training Support – A Way for MI to Get Involved” by Cpt. Arthur Hurtado.

The magazine also featured regular departments covering notes from the MI Schoolhouse, enlisted and officer branch notes, and a book review section. The inaugural issue concluded with letters from both Aaron, and Gen. Creighton Abrams, chief of staff of the Army, congratulating the members of the Military Intelligence Branch on their 12th anniversary on July 1.

 




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