Army

February 7, 2014

NCOA unveils Soldier portrait

Tags:
Gabrielle Kuholski
Staff Writer

From left, Sgt. Maj. Robyn Collier, Noncommissioned Officers Academy deputy commandant, and Command Sgt. Maj. Bret Wiegmann, NCOA commandant, unveil the oil painting of Master Sgt. John Wilson inside the Wilson Barracks Jan. 31.

Wilson Barracks, Building 62718 in Weinstein Village, gained a new addition to its main hallway Jan. 31. Soldiers and Civilians gathered briefly to witness the unveiling of the portrait of Master Sgt. John Wilson, the Soldier after whom the barracks is named.

This is not the first time this painting was hung.

Sgt. 1st Class Nolan Nagaue, Noncommissioned Officers Academy unit historian and training management noncommissioned officer in charge, described the painting’s history as a “story of lost and found.”

“On May 16, 1952, the Counter Intelligence Corps Center, [Fort Holabird, Md.,] dedicated three buildings to the honor of three Soldiers for their acts of valor, Sergeant Woodrow G. Hunter, 1st Lieutenant Eldon L. Allen and Master Sergeant John R. Wilson. Each building had an oil painting of their Soldier at the dedication,” Nagaue explained. “Now here’s the actual intelligence gap, ‘Where did the painting go after this?’”

Mike Bigelow, U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command, or INSCOM, command historian, had the theory that the plaque and painting moved to Fort Huachuca when the Counter Intelligence School relocated here.

“From the Counter Intelligence Corps Center, the painting most likely went to the U.S. Army Intelligence Command, then to the U.S. Army Intelligence Agency, when it then moved to Fort Meade [Md.] in 1974,” Nagaue said. “In 1976 the painting was used to memorialize the U.S. Army Intelligence Agency, or INTA, command suite.”

In 1977, the 902nd Military Intelligence Group took over the building, and subsequently the painting, after INTA and INSCOM merged. The 780th MI Bde., which now houses the facility, claimed the portrait remained a mystery — until it was properly identified by Bigelow.

“When the 780th [Military Intelligence Brigade] published its first issue of the BYTE, the unit newsletter, a challenge was issued to identify the original oil painting in the brigade headquarters,” Nagaue continued. “Of course, no one in the unit was able to identify it, until the INSCOM command historian [Bigelow] happened to glance at it.”

According to Lori Tagg, U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence command historian, “The story about how it got here has to be the most interesting thing about it, and I’m just glad we were finally able to honor Master Sergeant Wilson this way and have his picture here in the building that’s memorialized for him.”

Wilson, 25th Counter Intelligence Corps Detachment, was assigned to the 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division in South Korea. Previously, he served in the Asiatic Pacific Theater during World War II. Wilson is the recipient of several decorations including the Silver Star, Purple Heart and Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

FH renewable energy project to provide approximately 25 percent of installation’s annual electricity requirement

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The U.S. Army announced Monday plans to start development of a solar array that will provide about 25 percent of the annual installation electricity requirement of Fort Huachuca. “This will be the largest solar array in the Department of Defense on a military installation,” according to the Honorable Katherine Hammack, assistant secretary...
 
 

Whistleblower reprisal — what it is, isn’t

Many people who observe or learn of wrongdoing are often afraid to report it because they fear that if the word got out, negative action would be taken against them. In order for the office of the Inspector General, or IG, to provide assistance, it is important that the Fort Huachuca community fully understand what...
 
 
U.S. Army

Military Intelligence – Moment in MI history

Field Station Augsburg established in 1970 U.S. Army The enormous AN/FLR-9 “Elephant Cage” antenna array was erected at Field Station Augsburg in Germany. April 14, 1970 In 1970, the nation’s attention was focused on Viet...
 

 
Maranda Flynn

EPG celebrates 60 years, new small arc structure dedicated

Maranda Flynn From left, Rob Reiner, former Electronic Proving Ground technical director, Eddie Flores, EPG’s youngest employee, and Maj. Gen. Peter Utley, commanding general, U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command, cut the ca...
 
 
Gordon Van Vleet

NETCOM gains new commander during ceremony here Wednesday

Gordon Van Vleet Brig. Gen. Peter A. Gallagher, outgoing NETCOM Commanding General, passes the NETCOM flag to Lt. Gen. Edward C. Cardon, Army Cyber Command/2d U.S. Army Commanding General, while incoming NETCOM commanding gener...
 
 

Army tightens personal appearance, tattoo policy

WASHINGTON — The number, size and placement of tattoos have been dialed back under revised Army Regulation 670-1, which governs the Army’s grooming standards and proper wear of the uniform. The revised regulation was published Monday, along with Department of the Army Pamplet 670-1, outlining the new standards. Effective dates for the various changes can...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin