DoD

February 14, 2014

DoD to mandate documentation for lost, stolen CAC cards

Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyrone Marshall Jr.
American Forces Press Service 

WASHINGTON — Later this year, the Department of Defense will begin fully enforcing a previously optional policy regarding the reissuance of lost or stolen common access cards, a defense official said here Tuesday.

Sam Yousef, a program manager for identity and benefits policy at the Defense Human Resources Activity, discussed an update to the current common access card, or CAC issuance policy during an interview with American Forces Press Service and the Pentagon Channel.

“Beginning in late March [or] early April of this year, we are going to begin fully enforcing current common access card policy, which will require individuals to bring supporting documentation if they have had their ID cards lost or stolen,” he said. “If you have your card lost or stolen, you should work with your local security office or the individual sponsoring you for that ID card.”

People requesting a replacement card will need to produce a document on component or agency letterhead that explains that the card has been lost or stolen, he added.

Yousef noted the document should be signed, and individuals must bring it with them to have a new card issued.

“If the card has been stolen, they may also bring in the police report that accounts for that,” he added. “This will not only get the department in full compliance with our policy, but it will also create better accountability for individuals who have had their cards lost or stolen.”

Though this has been a part of the current policy, Yousef noted, it was not mandated at CAC card-issuing locations.

“Previously, in the last couple of years, we have actually updated the system to capture this documentation on an optional basis,” he said. “So what will happen in late March [or] early April is it will be required as part of that reissuance to bring supporting documentation with you.” The supporting documentation will be scanned and stored in the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System, he added.

This will affect all common access card-eligible individuals, both military and civilian, Yousef said.

In addition to being an additional security precaution, Yousef said this measure will help to prevent people from replacing their cards just as a matter of personal convenience.

“It creates better awareness with our local security offices [and] our individuals that are sponsoring our contractors for common access cards,” he said. “So this way, they have full oversight if someone is losing multiple ID cards.”

Following the update in requirements this spring, Yousef emphasized, it will be important for people to ensure they bring this documentation with them to have a card reissued, noting that most ID card-issuing sites already have been requiring it for quite some time.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

VA implements new online tool for military members, Families, transitioning out

In conjunction with the Soldier for Life – Transition Assistance Program, the new Veterans Employment Center, or VEC, is the federal government’s single authoritative online resource for connecting transitioning service members, veterans and their Families to meaningful career opportunities. The VEC is the first government-wide product that brings together a reputable cadre of public and...
 
 

ACAP has new name, now Soldier for Life – Transition Assistance Program

As part of the Soldier for Life Program that was introduced last year, the Army Career and Alumni Program, or ACAP, has changed names to the Soldier for Life – Transition Assistance Program, effective immediately. In an effort to better reflect the new direction of Army transition with the Soldier for Life Program, Army Chief...
 
 
Courtesy Photo

Army has ally in Natick lab

Courtesy Photo Secretary of the Army John McHugh, left, learns about the hypobaric chamber at the U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine during a March 15, 2012, visit to Natick Soldier Systems Center in Massach...
 

 

Monsoon start means break from hot weather — keep safety in mind this summer

In Arizona, as in other regions of the world including India and Thailand, we experience a monsoon, a season of high temperatures, high winds, and high moisture, resulting in potentially deadly weather. The term “monsoon” comes from the Arabic “mausim,” meaning “season” or “wind shift.” Even though rain doesn’t typically begin in the southern Arizona...
 
 

Melanoma – silent but deadly

Do you love having fun in the sun? If you do, it is essential you protect your skin from exposure to harmful sun rays known to cause skin cancer. Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States, and melanoma is the deadliest skin cancer. According to the National Cancer Institute, more...
 
 

Civilian of the Month

Rick Davis Agency: Engineer & Instrumentation Branch within Intelligence Electronic Warfare Test Directorate, U.S. Army Electronic Proving Ground Position and duties: Electronic technician; provides technical support for testing new Army Intelligence Surveillance Reconnaissance Systems. AISRS does all operational testing here for the military intelligence systems by conducting a test and r...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin