DoD

March 14, 2014

Army: Tobyhanna lands Gray Eagle Ground Control Station repairs

drone-pic
Repairs on the Ground Control Stations for Gray Eagle (MQ-1C) Unmanned Aircraft Systems are scheduled to begin at Tobyhanna Army Depot in fiscal year 2016.

Repairs on the Ground Control Stations for Gray Eagle (MQ-1C) Unmanned Aircraft Systems are scheduled to begin at Tobyhanna Army Depot in fiscal year 2016.

TOBYHANNA ARMY DEPOT, Pa. — The Army, Marine Corps, Air Force and Navy have named Tobyhanna Army Depot as the Depot Source of Repair for the Gray Eagle (MQ-1C) Unmanned Aircraft System Ground Control Stations.

The decision by the four services’ Maintenance Inter-service Support Management Offices recognizes the depot as the installation best suited for these repairs.

“Through the acquisition process, there is a lot of assessment that takes place, including core logistics analyses that look at our capabilities,” said Nick Caprioli, chief of the Business Development Division. “Tobyhanna was selected based on infrastructure, training and technical expertise for this type of work.”

Repairs for the new workload will begin in fiscal year 2016, with 19 Ground Control Stations, or GCSs, scheduled per year, totaling more than 75 systems through fiscal year 2018.

The Gray Eagle system is a long-range, high-altitude unmanned aircraft system, or UAS, that provides the capability to perform wide-area reconnaissance, surveillance and target acquisition. It is also capable of relaying communications and can be equipped for attack missions. The system consists of the aircraft, GCS, data terminals and data links. Each GCS controls one Gray Eagle aircraft and is used by the operator to perform command and control, payload control and weapon launch operations.

Due to their complexity, Gray Eagle systems and components are currently replaced rather than repaired, exhausting money and resources. Depot personnel are developing cost-effective solutions to repair GCSs and increase capability. Tobyhanna recognizes that the assignment of this Depot Source of Repair, or DSOR, will enable the depot to be selected for additional DSORs for UAS equipment.

Katlin Edmunds, business development specialist, noted that revamping the DSOR decision process will also help substantially reduce costs and bring more UAS work to the depot.

“DSOR selection helps ensure effective use of commercial and organic depot maintenance resources,” she said. “We have been aggressively trying to streamline processes, find inefficiencies and figure out the best way to accommodate new UAS workloads.”

Based on trends in the market, business management analysts anticipate that UAS will be the depot’s largest commodity in the future. As the only Army depot involved in the Integrated Product Team, or IPT, for Air Force and Army UAS, Tobyhanna is well positioned to receive workloads for additional UAS component repairs. The IPT is working with Tobyhanna to identify the need for any new test equipment, facilitation or training necessary for additional UAS work.

“Part of the planning process to bring in this workload is to have our engineers work with the program offices to make sure our capabilities are sufficient to provide the best solution for everybody involved,” said Caprioli. “The depot’s all-hands-on-deck approach to secure this DSOR selection has helped increase our marketability and should open doors for future UAS workloads.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
DoD

Navy: Joint Services Transcript request process streamlined

VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. — Sailors can expect their requests for Joint Services Transcript, JST, updates to take less time with a streamlined process that will begin Monday. The processing change removes the intermediate step of Sailors submitting JST requests to the Center for Personal and Professional Development’s, or CPPD, Virtual Education Center, VEC, in Virginia...
 
 
DoD

Marines: Staff sergeant becomes first amputee to graduate from grueling swim school

QUANTICO, Va. — The Marine Combat Instructor of Water Survival course is a grueling training evolution that requires Marines to swim a total of 59 miles over three weeks. The course that graduated on Nov. 25 started with nine participants, but only six were able to complete the challenge. One of those six had the...
 
 
DoD
Air-Force

Air Force: Band performs new holiday flash mob

The United States Air Force Band performs a holiday flash mob Tuesday, at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Va. The band’s mission is to honor those who have served, inspire America...
 

 
DoD
Marines

Marines: Man overcomes tumor in spine and joins Corps

Recruit Esra Mullner, Platoon 3269, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, stands at the position of attention at Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, Calif., Nov. 21. Mullner is a Boise, Idaho native and was recruited ...
 
 
DoD

Air Force funds research on thermal management technology for fighter aircraft

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio — Managing heat generated by electronic subsystems in next-generation aircraft is a vexing challenge for aerospace system designers. In the interest of meeting this challenge, the Air Force recently provided follow-on funding for a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) effort that is identifying improved methods for heat conduction and rejection...
 
 
DoD
Inspects

Marines refresh combat skills through hand grenade training

Sgt. Mike Saephanh, a field radio operator with Headquarters Battery, 5th Battalion, 11th Marine Regiment from Sacramento, Calif., inserts an M-67 fragmentation grenade into his grenade pouch during a hand grenade training exer...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin