Health & Safety

March 21, 2014

Fire season here, think ‘safety’ outdoors

Tags:
Maranda Flynn
Staff Writer

In May 2013, U.S. Forest Service personnel successfully conducted a 13-acre controlled burn in an area located between Ranges 8 and 9 on Fort Huachuca. These controlled burns take place in fire-prone areas in an effort to reduce the amount of dry grass and brush that can feed wildfires.

Spring is here, bringing with it the warm, dry season which brings people outdoors for leisure activities. Unfortunately, the arid climate in Southern Arizona can easily put a damper on the fun if people don’t keep fire prevention and safety in mind at all times. In conjunction with the Coronado National Forest (Sierra Vista District), the Fort Huachuca Fire Danger is being increased to “HIGH” — Yellow color — no open fires and only limited to established pits and barbecues.

Brush and vegetation is quickly drying out. This creates the right conditions in which wildfires start and spread quickly. Most often, fires are started by humans, and can be prevented. To avoid the unexpected, follow these important tips:

  • Do not throw lit cigarettes outside of a vehicle
  • Never leave campsite or picnic fires unattended
  • Ensure outdoor fires are completely extinguished before leaving the area
  • Avoid parking vehicles in tall grass or brushy areas
  • Immediately pick up and discard broken glass to avoid magnification fires
  • Allow hot coals to cool completely before discarding in a trash receptacle
  • Keep a fire extinguisher available while camping or in the home
  • Follow all instructions when using a grill or outside cooking device
  • Store propane in a cool, dark area, outside of the home
  • When using fire pits, keep covered and use away from the house
  • If a fire is spotted, regardless of size, immediately call 911 to report it

On Fort Huachuca, fire conditions are posted in five locations: the Sportsman Center, at the Main and East Gates, and at the entrances of Huachuca and Garden Canyons.

Depending on the conditions, other restrictions may apply. Always check the current conditions prior to an outdoor activity as weather conditions can change at any time. To verify, call the Fort Huachuca Fire Dispatch, 533.2116, or visit the Coronado National Forest website, http://fs.usda.gov/coronado.

Fort Huachuca’s new fire chief, Brad Nicholson, Directorate of Emergency Services, reminds the community that while day and night camping is a popular activity at this time of year, certain procedures must be followed before entering the canyons. Campers must inform Fire Dispatch to let them know where they are going and when, how many are in their party, what the intentions of the visit are, and if a camp fire is planned. When the visit is over, campers must inform Fire Dispatch of their departure.

For non-emergency fire safety and prevention questions, call Fort Huachuca Fire Dispatch, 533.2116.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
fire-pic

Arrival of monsoon signals easing of fire restrictions in Southeast Arizona

TUCSON, Ariz. – Effective July 11, the Bureau of Land Management Gila District, all districts of the Coronado National Forest, Saguaro National Park, Casa Grande Ruins National Monument, Coronado National Memorial, Chiricahua...
 
 

Monsoon start means break from hot weather — keep safety in mind this summer

In Arizona, as in other regions of the world including India and Thailand, we experience a monsoon, a season of high temperatures, high winds, and high moisture, resulting in potentially deadly weather. The term “monsoon” comes from the Arabic “mausim,” meaning “season” or “wind shift.” Even though rain doesn’t typically begin in the southern Arizona...
 
 

Melanoma – silent but deadly

Do you love having fun in the sun? If you do, it is essential you protect your skin from exposure to harmful sun rays known to cause skin cancer. Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States, and melanoma is the deadliest skin cancer. According to the National Cancer Institute, more...
 

 

Army dentists fight uphill battle against sugar

Consultant to the Surgeon General for Dental Public Health Sugar is being called “the new tobacco.” Its many forms have been linked to the increasing rates of diabetes, heart disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and other chronic diseases in the U.S. Army dentists have been fighting on the front lines against sugar for decades. Despite...
 
 

DUI Memorial Vehicle is reminder of dangers of drinking, driving

An SUV with a crumpled front end and dented doors has been transformed into a symbol of the ultimate cost of driving under the influence — the death of a friend or loved one. The black SUV is emblazoned with 262 white crosses, one for each person killed in 2013 in a DUI-related accident in...
 
 

ACS shares disaster preparedness information, ERP news, class dates

Ready Army, special needs Families Army Community Service, ACS, Exceptional Family Program, EFMP, shares information from the Ready Army website. Ready Army is the Army’s proactive campaign to increase the resilience of the Army community and enhance the readiness of the force by informing Soldiers, their Families, Army Civilians and contractors of relevant hazards and...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin