Local

April 18, 2014

Brown Canyon Ranch open house offers look into past

Inside the Brown Canyon Ranch home, visitors will tour an interior pertaining to the early 1900s. History buffs will also find more information on the families who owned the ranch.

Go back to ranching days in Cochise County and get a glimpse into past history less than 10 minutes from Sierra Vista.

The 9th Annual Brown Canyon Ranch Open House will take place April 26, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., at the ranch house in Hereford offering events entire Families can enjoy. Refreshments will be available at this free event which includes nature and history related walks and talks, adobe making and other crafts demonstrations, youth-centered activities and more.

Located in the foothills of the Huachuca Mountains, Brown Canyon Ranch takes visitors to a natural setting and demonstrates remnants of life from over one hundred years ago.

Heidi Schewel, Coronado National Forest public affairs officer, describes Brown Canyon Ranch “ … ‘a snapshot back in time.’ The whole ranch gives visitors a feel of how life was back around the turn of the last century,” she says.

See history sans time machine

Upon entering the site, visitors are welcomed by the ranch’s tin-roofed adobe house built between 1905 and 1907. For those interested in its interior, the home is open to the public during daylight hours.

While the outdoor property demonstrates a rural Sierra Vista in the early 1900s, visitors get a feel of what life was like here over a century ago by visiting the four-room interior. All furniture, decorations, linens and other household items reflect the time period.

“Part of the intent is to show people how life was during those times,” Shewel explains, adding that the house is kept as authentic as possible.

In addition to the house, the property includes a storeroom, water system, corrals and a pond, which today is a habitat for the endangered Chiricahua leopard frog.

From left, Terry Bannon, Cochise County civil deputy county attorney and horseback rider introduces horses Samson and Breezy to military dependent Alaya Robertson, 3, and her grandmother, Vanessa Robertson.

Landmark’s heritage

According to Friends of Brown Canyon Ranch, a volunteer group working to preserve the site, Brown Canyon Ranch had multiple owners. Their website, www.browncanyonranch.org, highlighted that John Thomas Brown and his family first settled the canyon property around the year 1800. Through the late 19th century, the land changed hands between several different settlers and ranchers.

After over a century of private ownership, the USDA Forest Service acquired Brown Canyon Ranch in 1998. Today it is the property of Coronado National Forest and has a partnership with the volunteer Friends of Brown Canyon Ranch to help keep its legacy alive.

Come visit during daylight hours

Schewel notes that the land offers a variety of recreational experiences.

“Part of the beauty of Brown Canyon Ranch is that it offers multiple opportunities; it offers a historic setting for people who are interested in the history of the Southwest, or the history of that time period,” she says. “It offers opportunities for hiking and mountain biking, or just relaxing at the picnic table.”

The activity doesn’t stop at hiking or mountain biking. For Terry Bannon, Cochise County civil deputy county attorney and equine enthusiast, the property is ideal for horseback riding.

In addition to building structures, Brown Canyon Ranch boasts a pond that provides a habitat for the endangered Chiricahua leopard frog. The species is native to southeastern Arizona, southwestern New Mexico and northern Mexico.

“For those who just want to contemplate or observe nature, there’s the area you can just stroll through or just sit and observe if you like,” Schewel says. “It depends upon what people like to do.” The area also attracts those who like to read outdoors, artists, photographers and picnickers.

To get there, take State Route 92 south to Ramsey Canyon Road and turn right. Stay on Ramsey Canyon Road to Calle Metate. Turn right, then left at the sign. On the day of the open house, signs will direct drivers to parking areas.

For more information about Brown Canyon Ranch and the open house, go to www.browncanyonranch.org.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

FH schools to celebrate National Bike to School Day March 06

Students from Colonel Johnston, General Myer and Colonel Smith Middle Schools will be riding or walking to school on March 6 along with parents, teachers and community leaders. The event will begin from 7 to 8:30 a.m. with youth, parents and community leaders riding or walking from parking lot locations listed below or from home....
 
 

Chalk Talk

Colonel Johnston Elementary School History will come to life in Amy Sullins’ second grade classroom on Tuesday. Students have been researching a famous person from the American Revolution or Westward Expansion. They are writing a short biography and memorizing a speech in the first person. They will come to school dressed as their person and...
 
 
Courtesy photo

Diving platform at Barnes Field House helps with Soldier training

Courtesy photo A Soldier in full uniform jumps down from a platform mounted 6 feet above the pool at Barnes Filed House. The platform was installed to give a semblance of realism to water safety training offered here and make a...
 

 
photo

Chalk Talk

Colonel Johnston Elementary School History will come to life in Amy Sullins’ second grade classroom on March 3. Students are researching a famous person from the American Revolution or Westward Expansion. They are writing a s...
 
 

Prescribed burning to take place on Fort Huachuca

Sierra Vista — Coronado National Forest, Sierra Vista Ranger District, in collaboration with Fort Huachuca will begin spring-season prescribed fires on Fort Huachuca Monday – Wednesday. Prescribed fire activities are expected to continue throughout the year when favorable weather permits. Current plans include three prescribed fire areas totaling approximately 4,700 acres. The areas to be...
 
 

Outreach Ministries Program coordinator retires after 47 years

The longtime Chapel Outreach Ministries Program director is retiring from the federal government after 47 years of civil service. Jo Moore, a Fort Huachuca Main Post Chapel icon, has spent the past 31 years of her civil service working for the chapel on the installation. During her tenure, she and the programs she started have...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin