Army

May 16, 2014

LRC provides support to deploying Soldiers

Tags:
Gabrielle Kuholski
Staff Writer

Spc. Annette Alvarado, Company A, 40th Expeditionary Signal Battalion, takes apart her improved outer tactical vest, or IOTV, to show she could do this correctly. Each Soldier receiving an IOTV for deployment had to demonstrate they could pull apart, put together and wear the IOTV properly during a special training session.

As Soldiers of the 40th Expeditionary Signal Battalion deployed May 1 and 4, they not only received emotional support from loved ones and friends, but also earlier logistical support from the divisions of the Logistics Readiness Center.

The LRC assisted the Soldiers in two different capacities making sure they were well-equipped for their missions. For those deploying to Afghanistan, the Central Issue Facility, or CIF, assisted in ordering the appropriate uniforms and other required gear.

According to Cliff Songer, Supply and Services Division chief, Logistics Readiness Center, in February, the CIF began ordering uniforms for all deploying 40th ESB Soldiers.

“We’re just trying to make sure they have all the items needed,” Songer said. “In logistics, you have to know people’s needs before they do.”

Those who deployed to Afghanistan also needed to order and learn how to use an improved outer tactical vest, or IOTV. According to Candy Hale, supply technician lead and CIF manager, the vests had to fit each Soldier in a specific way. This is due to the IOTV having six major components that each Soldier had to learn to put together piece by piece.

Once the uniforms and vests arrived, members of the 40th ESB attended a brief class held by CIF personnel where the Soldiers had to demonstrate they could pull apart, put together and wear the IOTV properly. CIF officials asked each Soldier to inventory the rest of his or her uniform.

“Familiarization and proper use of the equipment is key [to the Soldiers’ missions while deployed],” explained Sgt. 1st Class Sonny Rollins, 40th ESB first sergeant.

The logistical support didn’t stop there. For the group of Soldiers deploying to Asia, a Rapid Fielding Initiative, or RFI, was held March 17 at Fort Huachuca’s KICC Site. The RFI was a combined team effort of the LRC; Directorate of Planning, Training, Mobilization and Security; and the U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command, or TACOM.

Spc. John Biama, Company A, 40th Expeditionary Signal Battalion, left, reviews his paperwork with Morris Hilton, Central Issue Facility Supply technician. Soldiers of Company A, 40th ESB, arrived at the Central Issue Facility Feb. 21 to try on and order uniforms for their upcoming deployment to Afghanistan.

The week before, Soldiers and Civilians involved in the RFI setup shop and unloaded a truck hauling 50 pallets of boxes which contained the uniforms and began inventory of each item shipped to the KICC Site. After the completed inventory, the uniforms and other gear were distributed to its appropriate station for each Soldier to collect during the RFI.

The RFI consisted of a total of eight stations — two for processing and six for issuing 21 types of property. Once the official RFI began, all Soldiers were given checklists naming each property item a Soldier would receive.

As an item was distributed, a bar code on each Soldier’s checklist was scanned with a handheld scanner set up at each station. All bar codes were digitally uploaded to the Soldier’s common access card, or CAC. At the last checkpoint, Soldiers used their CAC card to electronically sign for all items.

Sgt. 1st Class Benjamin Watson, TACOM fielding lead, explained that receipt of the product is captured on each Soldier’s records during the scanning. When the Soldiers visited all stations and came to their final check-out, all items would show up on a property list when their CACs were scanned. This worked like a digital checklist for the distribution of property and ensured accurate distribution and accountability.

“The Soldiers digitally sign for [the equipment] and then they’re good to go; it’s officially their equipment at that point,” Watson added.

For Sgt. Brandon Williams and 1st Lt. Jimmy Brousseau, both from Company C, 40th ESB, the RFI was a smooth process for the Soldiers. Williams noted this would not have been possible without the meticulous pre-planning.

“They had a whole week to plan and get everything going and it shows in how easy it’s happening right now,” Williams said. “That’s logistics. It’s pre-planning, getting everything ready so when it happens, it’s a smooth process.”




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Courtesy photo by United Kingdom Ministry of Defense

Army researchers develop pocket-sized aerial surveillance device

Courtesy photo by United Kingdom Ministry of Defense A British Soldier holds a Prox Dynamics’ PD-100 Black Hornet, a palm-sized miniature helicopter weighing only 16 grams. Researchers with the U.S. Army Natick Soldier Resear...
 
 

Active duty Service members must change Roth TSP contributions

GRAFENWOEHR, Germany — Active duty members of the Army, Air Force or Navy making dollar-amount Roth contributions to a Thrift Savings Plan account should know that these deductions will stop on Jan. 31, unless action is taken. “The Roth [Thrift Savings Plan] contributions are going from a dollar figure to a percentage of pay,” said...
 
 

THANKSGIVING DAY SAFETY MESSAGE

Thanksgiving is a day set aside to pause, reflect and give thanks for the gifts of peace, freedom and opportunity we share as Americans. Holiday weekends provide a well-earned respite from work and an opportunity for travel to visit Family and friends. However, increased travel means increased exposure to the hazards associated with heavy holiday...
 

 
Defense Commissary Agency

Commissary Value Brand returns for more savings

Defense Commissary Agency Starting in December, the Fort Huachuca Commissary will add Commissary Value Brands to its shelves. FORT LEE, Va. – In response to growing patron demand for products comparable to the low-cost privat...
 
 

FH visitors, Civilian workers can dine at Exchange facilities

At military installations across the globe, the Army & Air Force Exchange Service provides a taste of home to Soldiers, Airmen and their Families. While rules governing who can buy merchandise at exchanges often apply to a select few, anyone can dine in exchange restaurants or pick up grab-and-go fare from Express locations. The Fort...
 
 

Chapel serves up community generosity

From left, Staff Sgt. Daniel Carnaghi, 62nd Army Band; Chaplain (Lt. Col.-P) Kim Norwood, senior Garrison chaplain; his wife, Cindy Norwood; Jo Moore, Outreach Ministries coordinator; and Spc. Benjamin Sepulveda, Main Post Chapel chaplain’s assistant, prepare to distribute turkeys to Fort Huachuca Families in need Thursday at the Main Post Chapel. Thanks to generous donations...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin