Health & Safety

July 3, 2014

Keep pets safe during 4th of July fireworks

City of Sierra Vista

Fireworks are a high point for any Independence Day celebration; however pets can become distressed by the additional noise and commotion. In fact, animal shelters across the nation are accustomed to receiving “July 4th” dogs — dogs who run off during the fireworks celebration and are rescued by animal control officers or good Samaritans.

Planning ahead and taking these basic precautions can prevent pet problems on Independence Day:

Leave pets at home: There are many Family and group activities that are perfect for pets, but a public fireworks display or a picnic, cookout or any other type of gathering where fireworks will be set off is not one of them — resist the urge to take your pets to such an event.

Don’t leave a pet in the car: With only hot air to breathe inside a car, pets can suffer serious health effects — even death — in a few short minutes. Partially opened windows do not provide sufficient air, but they do provide an opportunity for your pet to be stolen.

Give pets shelter: Keep your pets indoors at home in a sheltered, quiet area. Some animals can become destructive when frightened, so be sure to remove any items that a pet could destroy or that would be harmful to your pet if chewed. Leave a television or radio playing at normal volume to keep them accompanied while the Family attends Fourth of July picnics, parades and other celebrations.

Keep it quiet: If a pet is seriously distressed by loud noises such as thunder, consult with your veterinarian before July 4th for ways to help alleviate the fear and anxiety it will experience during fireworks displays.

Pay attention: Never leave pets outside unattended, even in a fenced yard or on a chain. In their fear, pets which normally would not leave the yard may escape and become lost, or become entangled in their chain, risking injury or death.

Tag Pets: Make sure pets are wearing identification tags so that if they do become lost, they can be returned promptly. Animals found are usually taken to the Nancy J. Brua Animal Care Center, where they will have the best chance of being reunited with their owners.

“Pets are family members, and it’s understandable that we want to include them in our holiday plans,” said Jeff Ingerson, animal control officer. “However, most pets will be more comfortable staying at home. Spare your furry friends the stress of fireworks, crowds and fanfare on the Fourth of July.”

For more information or questions, call the Nancy J. Brua Animal Care Center, 520.452.7500.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 

Civilian Fitness Program coming to Fort Huachuca

The Life is Good monthly workshops held its first workshop of the year Jan. 15 in the Network Enterprise Technology Command auditorium featuring Dr. Doug Briggs, the director of Human Performance at Fort Bliss, Texas. Briggs is an internationally recognized expert in his field with a lifetime of training, coaching and competing internationally. His presentation...
 
 

National Blood Donor Month celebrates donors, local collection scheduled

FALLS CHURCH, Va. — January is National Blood Donor Month, and this year, the Armed Services Blood Program, ASBP, would like to thank you for “giving to the red, white and blue.” “2014 was a great year for the Armed Services Blood Program,” said Navy Capt. Roland Fahie, ASBP director. “We have you — our...
 
 

Obama unveils next steps in cybersecurity plan

WASHINGTON — Continuing an effort to help defend the nation’s computer-connected systems, President Barack Obama announced Tuesday additional steps that call for more information sharing, modernized law enforcement and updated security data breach reporting. “Cyber threats pose an enormous challenge for our country,” the president said. “As long as I’m president, protecting America...
 

 

Retiree Council shares news you can use

Do retired Soldiers maintain healthier weights than Civilian retirees? Approximately half of the retired Soldiers whose height and weight were measured at medical appointments in military treatment facilities last year had a body mass index, BMI, that classified them as obese. Obesity rates for these retired Soldiers are significantly higher than the general population of...
 
 

FHFD shares wildfire safety tips for upcoming fire season

It’s time to prepare for the upcoming wildfire season. Remembering last year’s Brown Fire, there’s a high probability for fire related incidents and events again this year. Evacuations can come with little notice and no time to prepare. Initial wildfire preparedness by having a plan and an evacuation kit is much more important as this...
 
 

Prevent carbon monoxide poisoning during colder weather

Carbon monoxide, or CO, is an odorless, colorless and toxic gas. Because one cannot see it or smell it, it can kill people before they are even aware of its presence. Carbon monoxide is one of the leading causes of accidental poisoning deaths in America. Carbon monoxide is a product of incomplete combustion. Therefore, anything...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin