Local

July 18, 2014

Hummingbird banding continues on Fort Huachuca

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Maranda Flynn
Staff Writer

A hummingbird is caught in a mist net outside the Public Affairs Office, 3015 Carnahan St., across from the gazebo on Brown Parade Field July 1. The Hummingbird Monitoring Network meets twice a month to catch the hummingbirds, record data, and then release the tiny birds.

 
Hummingbird banding continues on Fort Huachuca at the Public Affairs Office, 3015 Carnahan St., across from the gazebo on Brown Parade Field. It begins at sunrise, around 5 a.m., and lasts for five hours. The public is invited to observe, and seasonal volunteers are welcome. Banding will take place on the following dates: The public is invited to observe, and seasonal volunteers are welcome. Banding will take place on the following dates: July 27; Aug. 10 and 24, Sept. 7 and 21; and Oct. 5 and 19.
 

Sharon Krimmel and Elissa Fazio, volunteers with the Hummingbird Monitoring Network, record data about a female hummingbird during the banding session July 1 in front of the Fort Huachuca Public Affairs Office. This process allows scientists to learn more about the different species and their numbers, and assists in improving the chances for long-term survival of hummingbirds.

 

Sharon Krimmel and Elissa Fazio, volunteers with the Hummingbird Monitoring Network, record data about a female hummingbird during the banding session July 1 in front of the Fort Huachuca Public Affairs Office. This process allows scientists to learn more about the different species and their numbers, and assists in improving the chances for long-term survival of hummingbirds.

 

After volunteers from the Hummingbird Monitoring Network collect pertinent data about a hummingbird, it is fed sugar water and then released.

 

Volunteers with the Hummingbird Monitoring Network place a band on the leg of a female hummingbird July 1, outside the Public Affairs Office at the end of Brown Parade Field. These bands help monitor site fidelity, life spans, and migrating and breeding patterns.

 

Elissa Fazio, a volunteer hummingbird bander, inspects a hummingbird and measures its beak size and wing span July 1. Members of the Hummingbird Monitoring Network record the data before banding the birds which are sometimes recaptured during different years and identified by the numbers on the tiny bands.

 

Feeders full of sugar water mixed in correct proportions are used to attract hummingbirds during the monitoring and banding event held outside the Public Affairs Office twice a month. Fort Huachuca guests can regularly view hummingbirds at these feeders on the front lawn. Volunteers clean and maintain the feeders so the birds are used to having a constant food source and return often on data-collection days.

 

Wendy Burke-Ryan and Sue Clark, hummingbird banding volunteers, watch for hummingbirds to feast at one of several feeders around the Fort Huachuca Public Affairs Office. When a bird gets close enough to the feeder, a volunteer pulls a string that quickly drops a mist net which catches the hummingbird so volunteers can obtain its data and band its leg before releasing the bird back into the wild.




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