Local

July 18, 2014

Hummingbird banding continues on Fort Huachuca

Tags:
Maranda Flynn
Staff Writer

A hummingbird is caught in a mist net outside the Public Affairs Office, 3015 Carnahan St., across from the gazebo on Brown Parade Field July 1. The Hummingbird Monitoring Network meets twice a month to catch the hummingbirds, record data, and then release the tiny birds.

 
Hummingbird banding continues on Fort Huachuca at the Public Affairs Office, 3015 Carnahan St., across from the gazebo on Brown Parade Field. It begins at sunrise, around 5 a.m., and lasts for five hours. The public is invited to observe, and seasonal volunteers are welcome. Banding will take place on the following dates: The public is invited to observe, and seasonal volunteers are welcome. Banding will take place on the following dates: July 27; Aug. 10 and 24, Sept. 7 and 21; and Oct. 5 and 19.
 

Sharon Krimmel and Elissa Fazio, volunteers with the Hummingbird Monitoring Network, record data about a female hummingbird during the banding session July 1 in front of the Fort Huachuca Public Affairs Office. This process allows scientists to learn more about the different species and their numbers, and assists in improving the chances for long-term survival of hummingbirds.

 

Sharon Krimmel and Elissa Fazio, volunteers with the Hummingbird Monitoring Network, record data about a female hummingbird during the banding session July 1 in front of the Fort Huachuca Public Affairs Office. This process allows scientists to learn more about the different species and their numbers, and assists in improving the chances for long-term survival of hummingbirds.

 

After volunteers from the Hummingbird Monitoring Network collect pertinent data about a hummingbird, it is fed sugar water and then released.

 

Volunteers with the Hummingbird Monitoring Network place a band on the leg of a female hummingbird July 1, outside the Public Affairs Office at the end of Brown Parade Field. These bands help monitor site fidelity, life spans, and migrating and breeding patterns.

 

Elissa Fazio, a volunteer hummingbird bander, inspects a hummingbird and measures its beak size and wing span July 1. Members of the Hummingbird Monitoring Network record the data before banding the birds which are sometimes recaptured during different years and identified by the numbers on the tiny bands.

 

Feeders full of sugar water mixed in correct proportions are used to attract hummingbirds during the monitoring and banding event held outside the Public Affairs Office twice a month. Fort Huachuca guests can regularly view hummingbirds at these feeders on the front lawn. Volunteers clean and maintain the feeders so the birds are used to having a constant food source and return often on data-collection days.

 

Wendy Burke-Ryan and Sue Clark, hummingbird banding volunteers, watch for hummingbirds to feast at one of several feeders around the Fort Huachuca Public Affairs Office. When a bird gets close enough to the feeder, a volunteer pulls a string that quickly drops a mist net which catches the hummingbird so volunteers can obtain its data and band its leg before releasing the bird back into the wild.




All of this week's top headlines to your email every Friday.


 
 

 
Tanja Linton

Intelligence Senior Leader Conference maps out ‘way ahead’

Tanja Linton U.S. Army Intelligence Center of Excellence Commander Maj. Gen. Robert Ashley opened the Intelligence Senior Leaders Conference at the Intelligence System Integration Laboratory Dec. 10. Senior intelligence leaders...
 
 

HOLIDAY SAFETY MESSAGE

The end of the year is a great time to take a moment to reflect on our many accomplishments at Fort Huachuca and as an Army. I want to thank everyone for their hard work and dedication as we continue to build on our accomplishments and enhance America’s fighting force. Many of us will be...
 
 

What makes chaplain assistants unique

SAN ANTONIO — As the U.S. Army Installation Management Command chaplain assistant sergeant major, I am proud of all the chaplain assistants supporting our Soldiers, Families and Civilians. We are celebrating 105 years since the Army officially introduced this unique Military Occupational Specialty, or MOS. The Army officially created the position of chaplain assistant On...
 

 
Sgt. Jarred Woods, 1st Sustainment Command (Theater)

Looking for career progression? Join Civilian Expeditionary Workforce

Sgt. Jarred Woods, 1st Sustainment Command (Theater) Department of the Army Civilians inspect a base expeditionary targeting surveillance systems-combined tower before transferring it over to the Afghan National Army near Kabul...
 
 

Colonel Smith MS Panthers end perfect basketball season

It was an exciting, perfect season for the Smith Panthers, a boy’s basketball team at Colonel Smith Middle School. The 14-member team started the season winning 3-0 at the three season tournament. During the regular season the team kept winning, ending their games 9-0. They also won during the CAC Championship. “[That’s] 14-0 wins total,”...
 
 

Fort community donates items in big way

From left, Warren “Russ” Barnes, logistics officer, shows Deborah Bohn, budget analyst, and Sheri York, RAYTHEON site lead, how to ride one of 55 bikes the 2nd-13th Aviation Regiment collected for the Fort Huachuca toy drive this year. This week, chapel personnel distributed toys and clothing collected from many units and organizations on Fort Huachuca...
 




0 Comments


Be the first to comment!


Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>


Directory powered by Business Directory Plugin